by Andy SmithPosted on

In Heather Benjamin’s recent work, her “lone cowgirl” character moves through a spectrum of emotions, attitudes, and phases that reflect the complexity of womanhood. She offered several of these new drawings in a show at Tokyo’s gallery commune under the banner “Burden of Blossom.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

For her new collection, Iris van Herpen collaborated with kinetic sculptor Anthony Howe, with riveting results on the runway. “Hypnosis” features several new pieces from van Herpen, who was featured on our site here. She says that Howe’s “Ominverse” sculpture serves as a “portal” into the collection.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Delphine Bonnet’s ceramic figures reveal inner worlds, with components that only at first appear as organs. Elsewhere, the artist creates stoneware creatures that appear at once apart of our own natural world and from another dimension entirely. The form offers an ancient quality to her works, further rooting them in the mythologies that inspire her.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Inspired by both the culture of the Khmer people of Cambodia and California’s street culture, Andrew Hem crafts vibrant peeks into everyday life. In a new show at Galerie Openspace titled “Fragmentz,” his recent experimentations are offered. Hem was last featured on HiFructose.com here and crafted the cover for HF Vol. 21.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Nichole Rae Klein’s oil and egg tempera paintings blend ordinary beings and unearthly flourishes. Those timeless materials, in particular, add a tension to the artist’s scenes and portraits. The painter says her process is time consuming, but the “slowness provides me enough time to look around the scene and notice what my subject might have missed during their attempt to keep everything under control.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Using the unexpected material of spaghetti, designer-artist Alice Pegna creates elegance and striking pieces adorning mannequins. Her series, “Ex Nihilo,” features ongoing experimentation that encompasses headdresses, dresses, and objects. The strands’ rigid, uncooked form allows the artist to craft geometric designs, culminating in the bold final result seen below.