by Andy SmithPosted on

Belinda Wiltshire crafts stirring oil paintings, carrying abstractions or other surreal touches that add intimacy to each portrait. The Melbourne-based painter works primarily in the figurative, and at times, fellow artists appear in her pieces. Peers like Tamara Dean and The Huxleys have been depicted by Wiltshire.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Bangkok-born artist Rook Floro mixes installation, sculpture, performance art, and other approaches for a singular, visceral experience. A statement says that he “draws from contention in his own life, which he likes to visualize in different series of artwork.” Recently, his “Blastard” experiences express a particularly vibrant and personal version of the artist.

by Andy SmithPosted on


The paintings of Brett Ferry, created using acrylics and oil on board, defy in both materials used and the components depicted. The blending of vibrant abstractions and natural forms feel like clashes of realities. The Australian artist’s works may deceive and appear as digital paintings, yet this simply part of the author’s charge.

by Andy SmithPosted on

“Ribbonesia,” a Japanese duo consisting of Baku Maeda and Toru Yoshikawa, creates and populates worlds out of ribbons. The flora or fauna depicted could be studied as individual, elegant components. Yet, together, the exhibitions take on an immersive, unthinkable quality, all using a simple and nondescript material.

by Andy SmithPosted on

British artist James Lake first began to use cardboard in his work after losing his leg to bone cancer 20 years ago, finding strength and versatility in this unlikely, yet readily available material. In a new video from Rajapack, Lake recalls his story and shows a bit of his process. Lake used Earth Overshoot Day as inspiration for a sculpture that “shows the size the earth would need to be to support the speed we are consuming the Earth’s resources. At the centre of the sculpture sits the Earth, and encasing half of it is a shell 1.7 times larger.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Dennis McNett, creating works under the moniker “Wolfbat,” creates wild woodcarvings, sculptures, and installations A new show at Heron Arts in San Francisco, titled “Hallowolfbat,” is an ornate, largescale adventure into McNett’s practice, with some of the creatures crafted for this show up to 10 feet tall. At the opening, the street was closed off and rock act High on Fire performed.