by Andy SmithPosted on

In the recent illustrations of Elif Varol Ergen, the artist dives further into the mystical with her feminine heroes and creatures, her own myths and contemporary lessons emerging. Since she was last featured on HiFructose.com (here), she released her first print publication, “A Sequence of Witches,” through Von Zos. The artist was also featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 19.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Michael Dandley’s gouache scenes render astral—and sometimes, cataclysmic—phenomenons happening both on Earth and far beyond. Also characteristic of his work are unexpected hues in each painting, whether it’s showing degradation of the planet or explorative adventures.

by Andy SmithPosted on

David Ambarzumjan’s large strokes across scenes reveal either what once existed or what will come to pass in landscapes through time. The 20-year-old painter, based in Munich, uses oils to craft these scenes, but has also experimented in watercolors, acrylics, pastels, and other materials. The particular series above and below, titled “Brushstrokes in Time,” take on differing eras of history.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Baldur Helgason’s animation-inspired oil paintings actually function as a “self-portrait,” as the artist has created an avatar of himself that he places in situations that have notes of art history and contemporary living. Through the more exaggerated and duplicated aspects of this character, he’s able to explore cerebral and personal themes.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In a set of encaustics and prints, artist Ethan Lauesen explores the perceptions of gender and LGBTQIA+ identity in regions like Interior Alaska. The work both documents and serves as a personal expression of those themes, also enveloping race and sexuality in this sprawling visual statement. Lauesen often shares looks into the process behind these works on their Instagram account.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Exploring the reality of “distorted or inaccessible memories,” Eliana Marinari applies several layers of aerosol acrylic paint over ink and pastel drawings. In the artist’s “Recognition Memory” and “Recollection” series, portraits and still-life works are given this treatment, respectively. The resulting work is both haunting and brings reflection on our own limitations, as viewers.