by Andy SmithPosted on


Cranio

Since its debut 15 years ago, Art Basel Miami Beach has spawned and spread across Miami and Miami Beach, with dozens of new fairs and events in tow. This year, we’re visiting some of these efforts. It can be a bit daunting (and a bit cringey) to navigate at times, but in these diaries, we’re going to take a look at some of the work that, for better or worse, made us pause during walks down those long hallways.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The textile work of Sabine Feliciano may recall a past biology class for some, as her “dissections” of animals play with the vibrant and textural possibilities of the form. Her “Wild Textile World” takes us inside varying creatures of the natural world. And each takes the traditionally gruesome and adds something new, even lighthearted, to these explorations.

by Andy SmithPosted on

John Guy Petruzzi uses watercolor and acrylics on synthetic paper for his vivid explorations on ecological disaster. The vibrant pops across these scenes from the natural world may be intriguing, but they tell a story far more ugly. As fellow painters Lauren Marx and Tiffany Bozic explore the dire consequences of our actions in meditations on life and death, Petruzzi also adds to this conversation a clashing and blending of textures and materials.

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The round, yet otherwise nondescript characters in Nadeem Chughati’s paintings and drawings feel the universal burdens and curiosities of any person. Whether he places them against lush landscapes or desolate, monochromatic backdrops, the vagueness of his figures remain. This changes the typical point of entry for figurative works. “I feel that people are very similar in many ways, so expressing my feelings can often strike a chord with those who relate to the situations that I put my characters in,” the artist said, in a past statement.

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Beverly Mayeri’s ceramic figurative sculptures become canvases for surprising, surreal scenes. The Bay Area artist also uses this opportunity to make connections between humanity the broader world around us—as well as more abstract concepts. In a statement, she explains her process and influences:

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The vibrant paintings of Marcos Navarro explore ancient and mystical ties between mankind and nature. The Spanish illustrator’s work touches the worlds of fashion, mural art, and fine art galleries. And his series “Binomio,” in particular, is the most focused realization of Navarro’s interest in humans and the natural world.