by Andy SmithPosted on

Italian sculptor Maurizio Cattelan has been a force of satire and provocativeness for the past few decades in the art world. He’s turned heads with sculptures of Pope John Paul II struck down by a meteorite, a praying Hitler in a former Warsaw Ghetto, and a taxidermied squirrel moments after suicide by self-inflicted gunshot. A new documentary, “Maurizio Cattelan: Be Right Back,” explores the life of the controversial artist.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Eggs bounce off of a stack of plates; a glass dissolves around a solid chunk of milk. Mainframe North, the Manchester-based arm of the motion design and VFX group Mainframe, recently put together a compilation of objects defying their natural properties and physics.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Street artists Pichi & Avo bring a blend of surrealism and classic urban art to walls across the world. Within these works, a conversation occurs between what we know as modern street art and iconography and styles of centuries far gone. The Spanish duo, in particular, has been referencing classical mythology in a slew of recent murals that have appeared in Miami, Hawaii, and New York.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Japan-born, Iowa City-based artist Sayuri Sasaki Hemann creates underwater worlds with fabrics and felt in installations. Projects like “Urban Aquarium,” which started in 2009 and appeared throughout Portland, recreate jellyfish and other sea inhabitants in places them in an airport and other unexpected places.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Philadelphia-based artist Jim Houser combines acrylics, found objects, and wood to create works that are both painting and collage. In using his “signature style of visual poetry and personal iconography,” the artist creates works that at once fresh and nostalgic. In a new show with Adam Wallacavage titled “And Yet Not Yet” at Philly’s Paradigm Gallery + Studio, Houser shows were this passion has led him lately. The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

For the past few decades, New York City-based painter Lisa Yuskavage has challenged norms in figurative art and blended progressive concepts with acknowledgement to the history of the form.