by Andy SmithPosted on

Hi-Fructose needs your help! 
The good news:  Hi-Fructose has expanded its reach to more countries and people than ever as a best selling art publication.

The bad news: Production costs (paper and shipping) are increasing but more so, the recent take over of one of our largest distributors (for a third time in two years!) has lead to major delays and withholding of payments to us and other publications. Despite increased sales and reach, this has drastically impacted our operational cashflow and ability to stay on track. The support of our readers will help us through this asteroid field of hurt.

Learn how to help at the jump!

by Andy SmithPosted on

The work of Gerwyn Davies blends photography and sculpture, utilizing everyday objects to obscure the body and create surreal vignettes. In his “Alien” series, the artist’s use of simplistic, geometric shapes offer an interplay between light and shadows against diverse backdrops. Elsewhere, in summer-themed series like “Heatwave” and “Sunny Boys,” he manipulates inflatables to evoke sun-soaked decadence.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Musician and visual artist Jon Langford offers pop-infused woodcuts in his new show at La Luz de Jesus Gallery: “Make Americana Great Again,” kicking off on Sept. 6 at the space. Otherwise known as a founder of punk act The Mekons and a member of alt-country act The Waco Brothers (among other bands), the artist’s work shows that one form is not divorced from another. Langford was at one time the artist-in-residence at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum in Nashville.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Dasha Pliska’s pencil drawings carry drama and ghostly grace. The Ukraine illustrator works primarily in monochromatic modes, elegantly moving between skin tones and billowing forms moving across the page. And recent personal projects, such as “repletion,” show the artist’s knack for utilizing negative space.

by Andy SmithPosted on

With her cascading, phosphorescent figures and blended mediums, Maura Holden is one of today’s leading practitioners of visionary art. The Philadelphia-born artist is self-taught, yet utilized the techniques of past masters—particularly Ernst Fuchs, a major influence for the artist.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Examining masculinity and power, Scott Scheidly’s paintings re-contextualize real and fictional villains. Elsewhere in Scheidly’s practice, he injects the grotesque into floral motifs, further underscoring the painter’s knack for satire and subverting expectations. The artist’s humor is also evident in his short bio: “At age four I attempted my first art project by devouring a 10 pack of crayons thus turning my diaper into a Jackson Pollock.”