by CaroPosted on

Missouri based artist Adrian Cox’s fleshy “borderlands” and their inhabitants may look off-putting and weird, but there is also natural beauty to be found in this imaginary world. His oil paintings, works on paper, and sculptures are all treated with the soft touch of 19th century Romantic landscape painting. Previously covered here, Cox’s human-like subjects called the “Border Creatures” have been compared to David Lynch’s Elephant Man; abstract lumps of skin and muscle with vague features. His latest series introduces new characters, “gardeners,” the caretakers of glowing mounds of birds, bugs and snakes. 

by CaroPosted on

Urban Nation in Berlin celebrated the 8th and, reportedly, final chapter of its “Project M” exhibition series this past weekend. Curated in collaboration with London’s StolenSpace Gallery, the exhibit revealed new murals, ten large scale panels at the nearby Urban Nation office, and a collection of new works at Urban Nation’s gallery space by 10 artists: Shepard Fairey, D*Face, Maya Hayuk, Cyrcle, Word To Mother, Miss Van, The London Police, Joram Roukes, Snik, and Evoca1. Most traveled to Berlin for the occasion, making this installment a representation of Urban Nation’s international reach through its collaborators.

by Sasha BogojevPosted on

After painting mostly around his homeland and some cities in Europe, Barcelona-based artist Pejac (covered here) recently took off on a tour around the Far East. During his trip, he stopped in Hong Kong, Seoul and Tokyo, leaving his mark in every city. From introducing new images and concepts to recreating some familiar ones, Pejac demonstrates his ability to work in different environments or mediums. Covering various subjects, mostly referring to the places he’s visiting, the new works Pejac has created range from effective window-drawings to sculptural pieces.

by Nathan SpoorPosted on

Syd Bee is a Seattle-based painter that creates figurative paintings that often appear to exist in a dreamlike state. Working in oils, the artist employs a technique of creating a pastel-hued glow around her subjects. Bee enjoys the way the soft outer edges of the paintings feel optically; which enhances the mysterious effect produced by her oil paintings. Check out our interview with the artist after the jump, as she discusses her new work.

by CaroPosted on

Portrait artist Mary Jane Ansell may dress up her female subjects in the traditional European fashions of men, but they evoke a strong femininity. Her near-hyper realistic oil paintings portray young girls who step into the roles of regents and soldiers, roles that women were not eligible for. Their clothing, such as the red coat, also takes on a modern connotation in fashion as being punk and fashionably forward. However, her subjects’ personalities are more refined than tomboyish, with a delicate beauty in the way she draws eyes and features. Ansell’s newer works mix such political elements with those of nature, such as flowers and animal skulls. Take a look at new latest paintings for “Liberty’s Arc,” after the jump.

by CaroPosted on

While women artists have been involved in making art throughout history, their work has been dismissed or not as often acknowledged in comparison to men. Today, women do have important roles in society as writers, painters, sculptors, dancers, business leaders, among others, but they are still statistically under-represented by art institutions. “Trifecta”, which opens this Friday at Jonathan Levine Gallery, will shed a light on three prominent women in Contemporary art – Handiedan, Mimi Scholz, and Sandra Chevrier. Curator Yasha Young shares, “This exhibition addresses the fact that art created by women has been historically dismissed as craft as opposed to fine art, affecting the development of women in art throughout history. I would like to open doors for women artists and encourage them to step out and up.”