by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

While GIFs have yet to find an established place in the art world, they’re fascinating because they have the potential to go beyond the frozen image in two dimensions. Texas artist Hayden Zezula, aka Zolloc, works as a designer and animator by day, but has an expansive portfolio of animated GIFs that will cause chills to creep down your spine. His latest series, titled “Oswra,” features a cast of mutated babies with pale gray skin. Their multiplying limbs move in geometric arrangements that are both hypnotizing and frightening. Take a look below.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Italian artist Alessandro Gallo (featured in HF Vol. 24) presents a disorienting series of sculptures for his upcoming solo show at Jonathan LeVine Gallery, “Strani Incontri.” The show’s title translates to “strange encounters,” which is an apt summary of the experience of coming upon one of Gallo’s large-scale clay figures. Expertly reproducing human and animal anatomy, Gallo blends the two to create convincing hybrids of man and beast. The works produce an almost eerie sense of unheimliche, as Freud put it: when the familiar becomes uncomfortably strange.

by Roxanne GoldbergPosted on

Creepy creatures, spindly figures and quirky narratives compose the illustrations of Bill Carman. Pigs in suits and yin-and-yang armored headgear stare at one another – snouts pressed together – with eyes wrinkled with age of wisdom. An angry bronze-faced rabbit sits in the foreground holding a screwdriver, gazing at the viewer and threatening to unscrew the boars’ masks. Though Conunganger has an Animal Farm aesthetic, They have My Eyes evokes a Tim Burton sentiment.

by CaroPosted on

On September 13th, fellow artists Victor Castillo and Alex Diamond will exhibit new paintings at Heliumcowboy‘s temporary space, Holstenhof, in Germany. Although longtime friends, “Weapons of Mass Seduction” is their first time exhibiting together. It was conceptualized as a joint show to celebrate their shared taste in content with a fantasy-inspired narrative.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Yesterday we brought you our first recap of Portland’s second annual edition of Forest for the Trees, a new mural festival featuring 20 international and local artists. Today, we round up the rest of the murals. Philadelphia-based artist Nosego played with negative space for his piece, which sparkles on a small section of his giant wall with glowing contrasts. Nearby, Brendan Monroe and Souther Salazar collaborated almost seamlessly, blending whimsy with geometry and design. Paige Wright incorporated three-dimensional elements into her mural while Zach Yarrington opted to create text-based work. Take a look at the highlights after the jump.

by Soojin ChangPosted on

I moved from San Francisco to New York City a year ago, and one of the many things I thought I’d never miss is the fog. Thick clouds of water droplets suspended in my daily existence are a thing of the past. So going to Fujiko Nakaya’s fog installation “Veil” — an ethereal piece at the Glass House created using fog nozzles that respond to weather conditions — in midsummer felt entirely like a time warp, to my former life in the Bay, and to an impeccably embalmed setting of an architectural triumph in Mid-Century America.