by Andy SmithPosted on

William Kidd‘s ceramic sculptures imagine lifeforms that don’t exist in our world. The artist attributes the particularly organic appearance of his pieces to “the choice of a low-fire red earthenware clay which is then finished using oxide stains, underglazes, and my signature crawl glaze.” He says that those materials allow the richness and natural vibrancy of his work to shine.

by Andy SmithPosted on

You can now pre-order Hi-Fructose: New Contemporary Fashion in our store here. The book is an experimental look into the worlds of wearable art and fashion, where technology, sculpture, experimental materials, and other-worldly viewpoints have sparked a distinctly different kind of new contemporary fashion that bends genres and sparks new conversations, presenting atypical fashion through a Hi-Fructose lens. Pre-Order today and get an exclusive 18×24″ poster, available only on our site and for pre-orders. The book is published by Cernunnos, and it’s edited and designed by Hi-Fructose co-founder Attaboy.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Colin Raff’s “Perturbatorium” is a collection of unsettling animations and collage work. Recalling the work of Max Ernst or Terry Gilliam, the work has a particular movement because of his “step-frame animation” method. The animations are rooted in Raff’s photo-collage work, which he has described as having “distinct 20th c. antecedents (Heartfield, Ernst, Höch, etc.).”

by Andy SmithPosted on


Hi-Fructose co-founder Annie Owens has a new giclée print available in our store. The 13″ x 20″ “Piggies” prints are limited to 40, with 20 of those sold in the Hi-Fructose store. All are signed and numbered. Order it here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


A 50-foot-tall Minotaur and a giant spider recently descended upon Toulouse, France, as part of the La Machine theater company’s most recent performance. The group, lead by François Delarozière, created the show “The Guardian of the Temple,” using the city as a makeshift “labyrinth.” Sixteen technicians helped work the minotaur creature alone.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Though dipping into the otherworldly, Kelly Denato‘s acrylic paintings represent the prism of human emotions. At once optimistic and sullen, the figures in her work appear to be constantly in a state of transition. The New York City artist’s gallery work is a complement to her illustrative jobs with the likes of Nickelodeon, Timex, and other major clients.