by CaroPosted on

Los Angeles-based artist Andrew Hem’s highly anticipated new solo project “Cold Water” opened last month at LeBasse Projects. By the time doors had opened, Hem’s entire exhibition was sold. Owner Beau Basse complimented the artist on his strong point of view and enthusiasm, who confronted themes of isolation and personal conflict in the “Cold Water” series. The exhibition is laid out as a chronological story filled with private references and lush new environments. Each painting feels illuminated by a cold palette of primarily blue and green corpse-like figures, rising from solitude to seek a road to happiness. “Cold Water” shares its opening with Melissa Haslam’s “Kigurumi”, now exhibiting at the Lebasse Chinatown space. On view until August 13th, opening night photos after the jump. – Caro

by Ken HarmanPosted on

Next weekend, July 16th, LeBasse Projects in Culver City will be presenting the latest body of work from artist Andrew Hem, ‘Cold Water.’ The introspective paintings explore the feelings of seclusion and loneliness, yet more importantly, as an indicator of the artist’s skill, do so in a manner that invokes an odd warmth and comfort. Hem is currently finishing up a mural, get a look at the large outdoor piece’s progress, as well as a couple of the new paintings, after the jump.

by Sponsored PostPosted on

Andrew Hem, who appears in our latest volume, opens a solo show tonight at Seattle’s Roq La Rue Gallery. We love his use of patches of color and hazy narratives. Stella Im Hultberg’s solo opens at the gallery as well, showcasing her wonderful ethereal female forms with Art Nouveau inspired flair. Check out our selections from the show from both artists here.

by CaroPosted on

It’s a warning sign at art galleries and museums around the world: “Don’t touch the artwork.” But one artist based in Laguna Beach, California wants you to do just that. Andrew Myers creates mixed media works with screws, oil paint, charcoal, bronze, cement, and found objects. “Distinct”, “expressive” and “tactile” are words he uses to describe his portraits made of thousands of screws (a single piece can use up to 10,000 or more), where touch is important to experiencing the work as it brings the subjects to life with volume and texture.

by CaroPosted on

Andrew Schoultz’s art is filled with chaotic imagery, expressing a rather dystopian vision through a variety of techniques, from sculpture to collage, street art to installations to paintings. Featured here on our blog, his eclectic work cultivates an arsenal of personal symbolism: fragments of dollar bills, fractured Grecian urns, ripped American flags, war horses, and slave ships are just a few of the symbols he uses to juxtapose Western culture with allusions to conflict and exploitation.

by CaroPosted on

Colored pencils haven’t quite received the recognition of their counterparts as a fine art material- and yet over the years, we’ve featured artists from all over the world who have surprised us with what can be achieved by these utensils from our elementary school sets. CHG Circa in Los Angeles sent a group of international artists a set of their own and invited them to refer back to their child imagination.