by Andy SmithPosted on

John Guy Petruzzi uses watercolor and acrylics on synthetic paper for his vivid explorations on ecological disaster. The vibrant pops across these scenes from the natural world may be intriguing, but they tell a story far more ugly. As fellow painters Lauren Marx and Tiffany Bozic explore the dire consequences of our actions in meditations on life and death, Petruzzi also adds to this conversation a clashing and blending of textures and materials.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The round, yet otherwise nondescript characters in Nadeem Chughati’s paintings and drawings feel the universal burdens and curiosities of any person. Whether he places them against lush landscapes or desolate, monochromatic backdrops, the vagueness of his figures remain. This changes the typical point of entry for figurative works. “I feel that people are very similar in many ways, so expressing my feelings can often strike a chord with those who relate to the situations that I put my characters in,” the artist said, in a past statement.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Beverly Mayeri’s ceramic figurative sculptures become canvases for surprising, surreal scenes. The Bay Area artist also uses this opportunity to make connections between humanity the broader world around us—as well as more abstract concepts. In a statement, she explains her process and influences:

by Andy SmithPosted on

The vibrant paintings of Marcos Navarro explore ancient and mystical ties between mankind and nature. The Spanish illustrator’s work touches the worlds of fashion, mural art, and fine art galleries. And his series “Binomio,” in particular, is the most focused realization of Navarro’s interest in humans and the natural world.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Elif Varol Ergen’s arresting illustrations blend themes of feminism, mysticism, and identity. The Turkish artist uses both traditional and digital means to relay these visions, armed with a robust mix of influences and approaches. She was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Daniel Agdag’s whimsical, complex sculptures are crafted entirely out of cardboard and depict outlandish machines. The Australian artist, who’s also a filmmaker, labels his work “sketching with cardboard,” as he doesn’t use intricate planning, measuring, or sketching to pull off each piece, despite its meticulous appearance. Instead, the plays with the components until pleased.