by Andy SmithPosted on

Hector Javier Martinez Mendez’s pottery practice brings energetic, skeletal figures to the surfaces of jars, pots, and plates. Since first garnering a reputation for his Day of the Dead-themed works, his creations have grown more detailed and popular.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jess Johnson, who is featured in the current volume of Hi-Fructose Magazine, worked with Simon Ward for the massive virtual reality-driven exhibition “Terminus” at Heide Museum of Modern Art, with a choose-your-own adventure element to the installation. The exhibition kicks off this month and runs through March 1, 2020.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Andrea Salvatori subverts art-historical themes and motifs in his sculptures, reimagining the interior of Renaissance-style figures or unsettling forms emerging from pottery. He moves between traditional and digital means to execute these works.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Benjamin Sack draws imaginary cityscapes that recall historical metropolitans and motifs that have graced the Earth for millennia. His hyperdetailed approach not only shows a command of varying structural textures but also a power over perspective. (Sack was last featured on HiFructose.com here.)

by Andy SmithPosted on


KeFe

Ferris Plock and Kelly Tunstall offer collaborative and solo works in their new show at 111 Minna Gallery in San Francisco, where they’re based. “PMA,” which stands for “Positive Mental Attitude,” applies their vibrant characters and patterns to their viewpoint of the changing city (or “living beast,” as they refer to it) around them. The show runs through Dec. 20 at the space. In their collaborative mode, the pair becomes “KeFe.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Anna Hoyle’s paintings of fake but humorous books are full of self-deprecation and universal absurdities (like the plight of depending on an IKEA pencil). One of our favorite details on her gouache paintings are the price stickers, which can carry their own jokes on each piece.