by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Amsterdam-based collage artist Handiedan recently visited Berlin to add her contribution to Urban Nation’s Project M, arguably one of the coolest buildings in the German capital. The arts organization has been inviting artists to create window installations and large-scale murals (see our coverage of Eine’s recent piece there) and Handiedan recently made her mark on the multi-story facade with an enormous, wheat-pasted mural. While her typical work consists of smaller-scale, textured collages of vintage pin-up girls with baroque flourishes, she seamlessly adapted this style to a larger format. Check out her piece and stay tuned for more coverage of her upcoming solo show “Vesica Piscis,” opening at Seattle’s Roq La Rue this Thursday.

by CaroPosted on

Beau Stanton has new works he describes as “enigmatic illuminations”, now on view at the Crypt of Saint John the Baptist in Bristol. Curated by Andy Phipps, the show’s title “Tenebras Lux” refers to darkness and light, created by these lit panels emerging out of the crypt’s dark, anicent space. The 9 stained glass panels combine elaborate oil painting with original medieval lead framework, inspired by Classical Antiquity and religious iconography that has long influenced Stanton.

by CaroPosted on

Artist duo Gosha Levochkin and Devin Liston have made a name for themselves as DevNgosha, combining their backgrounds in illustration and fine art. Years after their first collaboration, Soze Gallery is showcasing their individual talents in side by side solos “GROWN UPS” and “LOST” (previewed here). As collaborators, they’ve come up with a system of working together and creating, where one starts a piece and the other finishes it, and vice versa. Now abandoning that system, we can see Liston and Gosha are artists who like to play with varying aesthetics.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Russian artist Yulia Brodskaya creates playful illustrations, installations and paper cut works using a unique method she developed after leaving her graphic design job in 2006. The artist rolls tiny strips of colorful paper into spirals that she aggregates into larger shapes, creating textural works that lie somewhere on the horizon between two and three dimensions. Her whimsical, springy work invites a sense of optimism. While paper cut art is typically a small-scale medium, Brodskaya often creates mural-sized artworks and installations for commercial clients, using paper to transform rigid spaces into fantastical realms.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Jenny Morgan’s (featured in HF Vol. 21) paintings reveal beauty in simplicity. She often depicts nude figures with poignant expressions, stylizing their bodies to fit her sunrise-hued palette in lieu of focusing on minuscule details like hairs and wrinkles. The simplification of her subjects gives her work a glossed-over effect that pushes it from objective realism into surreal territory. For her latest exhibition “The Golden Hour” at Plus Gallery in Denver, Morgan explored notions of spirituality and the cycle of life. While her major focus has always been faces, often using herself as a subject, her exhibition features a substantial amount of paintings of skulls, alluding to the fading nature of youth and the ephemerality of the body. Take a look at the work in the show below and check out “The Golden Hour” on view through October 18.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Based in Rotterdam, Netherlands, Anouk Griffioen creates haunting, mural-scale charcoal drawings that offer glimpses into lush, overgrown places where humanity and nature seamlessly connect. The human subjects of her work are merely guides for viewers to immerse themselves in the sublime landscapes. It’s as if Griffioen is inviting her viewers to imagine themselves as her often faceless characters. There is a fashion-conscious aspect to her work as well: the svelte, model-like bodies strike casual yet glamorous poses, wearing smartly tailored outfits that camouflage with their surroundings.