by Andy SmithPosted on

Carson Davis Brown’s “Mass” project puts site-specific, color-based installations in big box stores and other “places of mass” without permission. These visual disruptions take otherwise disparate objects and groups them into temporary sculptures. The project has taken the artist to stores across the U.S. A primary charge for the project is to make passers-by more aware of their environment by recontextualizing the items around them.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Photo Credit: Andrew Beveridge/ASB Creative

Australia-based artist Joshua Smith taught himself to create absorbing, hyper-detailed miniatures of structures and objects strewn across cities. These works maintain the grounded, authentic erosion of urban environments. Many of the buildings are rundown or at the very least, aged appropriately. “His miniature works primarily focus on the often overlooked aspects of the urban environment such as grime, rust, decay to discarded cigarettes and graffiti perfectly recreated in 1:20 scale miniatures,” a statement says.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Johannah O’Donnell’s acrylic paintings on wood blend geometric forms, abstraction, and wild animals. The Florida native, who also is an art instructor, cites Spanish surrealism, Pop Art, and the sci-fi/fantasy genre as influences in her work. O’Donnell was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

At Galerie Le Feuvre in Paris, works by Invader are presented in a new show called “Masterpieces.” Invader is the enigmatic street artist known for crafting square ceramic tiles into images that resemble digital, pixelated renderings throughout the past few decades. The gallery says that the show was triggered by “discovery of works dated from 1997.” The artist was featured way back in Hi-Fructose Magazine Vol. 2.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Matthew Ivan Cherry, a Boston-based painter, creates oil portraits that ooze with vulnerability and a erratic, yet cohesive style. He uses his subjects, often met on the streets or on social media, to explore issues of individuality, gender identity, and the inherent beauty of the human form. Certain projects, like “somewhereX,” are tethered to Cherry’s upbringing as a Mormon. The project features enormous portraits of LGBTQ mormons (whether active or inactive), including Cherry himself.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Ohio-born oil painter Herb Roe creates surreal scenes that are actually grounded in reality. Recent work documents the Courir de Mardi Gras, a traditional pre-Lenten bash attended by Cajun and Creole residents of his adopted home of Louisiana. In these celebrations, revelers wear costumes “drawn from medieval traditions, frontier era depictions of Native Americans and political and social commentary,” the artist says. Partially disguised, the members of these parties bring a lively and uninhibited energy to the proceedings.