by Sarah GianelliPosted on

There’s a reason Hi-Fructose keeps tabs on Tokyo artist Shohei (aka Hakuchi) Otomo (featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 20). The only son of great manga artist Katsuhiro Otomo, the acclaimed writer and director of the anime cult classic Akira, Hakuchi carries on his father’s legacy with his own graphic illustrations that combine Japanese iconography with a dark, retro-punk edge and a healthy dose of sardonic humor.

by CaroPosted on

As Issued, Costa Mesa based bookstore and art gallery, celebrates three years tonight with a show curated by Kevin Peterson and Marcas Contemporary‘s Dana Jazayeri. Titled “Tres Ãnos”, As Issued’s 3rd year Anniversary show will highlight new and original pieces by 21 artists- Nathan Spoor, JeanPaul Malozzi, Jessica Ward, Shane Jessup, Anthony Hurd, Edith LeBeau, Cate Rangel, just to name a few. They are primarily street artists and figurative painters of the Lowbrow generation, who credit their inspiration to ‘zine culture’ and share cutting edge aesthetics.

by CaroPosted on

Coinciding with Merry Karnowsky gallery’s “Parallel Universe” (covered here) is Lezley Saar’s “Monad”. For her latext exhibition, Saar focuses on the metaphysical reality, mixed with her signature Victorian subjects. Saar referred to philosopher Gottfried Leibniz’s definition of “Monad” for her show’s concept: “an unextended, indivisible and indestructible entity that is the basic or ultimate constituent of the universe, and a microcosm of it.” Proudly an artist of mixed ethnicity, Saar’s colorful women can be linked to people in her own life, many of whom were in attendance at Saturday’s opening. So, while her theme is grand, her personal touches make it feel familiar.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

A recent graduate of the Shenkar College of Design, emerging Israeli fashion designer Noa Raviv has already made waves with the debut of her fashion collection “Hard Copy” — a project that brings cutting-edge architectural and sculptural techniques to haute couture. Raviv worked with 3D printing company Stratasys to develop digital models that would serve as the inspiration for her work. She purposely chose the defective 3D models her software generated — ones that would be too structurally unsound to actually 3D print — to inspire her clothing patterns. The artist says she was interested in the idea of turning something that only exists in the digital realm into a physical object, surpassing the limitations of the 3D printer with the human hand. Dominated by grids that encase organic patterns, the collection articulates humanity’s precarious position between nature and technology.

by Ysabelle CheungPosted on

It’s all too easy to walk through life in a robotic daze, ignoring pressing issues right in front of our eyes. However, the current show at Above Second Gallery in Hong Kong, “Somedays Somedaze,” intends to snap you out of the dreamy and sometimes destructive somnambulism of daily life. In this show, Hong Kong based artist collective Parents’ Parents (see our earlier profile of them here) and Singapore native Kristal Raelene Melson pair up to discuss a host of contemporary issues and reflections as a response to society and mass consumption, and the ever-present question of what it means, or takes, to be human in today’s world.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

A veritable escape from reality, Mandy Greer’s current exhibition, “The Ecstatic Moment” at the Hudson River Museum, immerses the viewer in all of Greer’s diverse artistic practices at once. Constructing a new world through her large-scale crochet installations, Greer uses yarn to link together elaborate costume works, fantastical photography, experimental films, sculptures and collections of objects (both natural and manmade) that she gathered herself or appropriated from the museum’s permanent collection.