by Andy SmithPosted on

Roman Klonek, based in Düsseldorf, Germany, combines the styles of classic cartoons and pop advertisements with the medium of woodcut printing. For the past 15 years, the Poland-born artist has constructed pieces made with knives, chisels, and wood, even if his creations have the precision of other methods. These works ape propaganda, construct original monsters, and recall vintage design.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Nicole Rifkin, a Brooklyn-based artist who specializes in digital illustration, offers nostalgic, brightly hued narratives in her pieces. Rifkin, who does editorial work for The New Yorker and Medium and founded of the art magazine Ipsum, creates scenes that obscure faces and figures, rendering pops of colorful abstraction against realism.

by Sponsored PostPosted on

Opening June 25th, Archimedes Gallery will be showing 25 new wood fired ceramic & cast bronze sculptures by Eva Funderburgh and 6 new paintings by Josh Keyes. Special events include, two different Josh Keyes limited edition print releases offered in-house only, starting at 10 am Saturday, June 25th along with Josh and Eva doing an artist demonstration from 2pm – 4pm followed by an artists’ reception from 5pm – 8pm. See preview images of the show after the jump!

by Andy SmithPosted on


Kitsch painter Luke Hillestad, based in Minneapolis, tackles age-old narratives and a primal aesthetic in his works. He partly learned his craft from legendary figurative painter Odd Nerdum, who famously forged a movement that combined the way of the Old Masters with storytelling and emotion. A former land surveyor and classically trained guitarist, there are tinges of other influences in Hellstad’s work.

by Annie OwensPosted on

Jessica Joslin is the creatrix of a curious menagerie of hybird creatures, composed of a varied anatomy of bone, glass, leather and metal, meticulously assembled to look like real specimens. Her work recalls a sense of the Victorian era’s obsession with detail and death and yet retains a playfulness attributed to circus shows of trained animals performing gravity defying feats. Hi-Fructose was recently able to interview the artist, take a look at her intriguing responses after the jump.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Since 2012, Jillian Dickson has explored motherhood and nature’s flora and fauna with the series “Our Epidural Currency.” These drawings combine blooming flowers, female organs, and insects for a cohesive portrait of evolutionary strength. Yet, in each of these bold renderings, the point of entry is a complex beauty found in these self-contained ecosystems. The goal, she says in a statement, is to “examine the forgotten and neglected connection between the female tactile body and wild mother nature.”