by Margot BuermannPosted on

In her signature style that blends magic realism with storybook illustration, American painter Lori Nelson explores the mysterious, frightening, and undeniably magical world of teens in “Cryptotweens Are Like”. Her new series of oil-on-panel paintings depicts monstrous tweens and teens that, on the surface, bear little resemblance to ordinary youths. Nelson’s “cryptotweens” trek through dark forests alongside animal companions, are covered in fur and scales, and seem to harness their powers through their smart phones (okay, maybe that last one sounds like your average teen).

by CaroPosted on

In painting nature, artist David Kroll evokes a classical sense of beauty and fragility. He combines elements of naturalist painting and still life in his portrayal of animals like elegant egrets and koi which perch and swim around delicate objects. Though remarkably detailed and inspired by early landscape painting, Kroll has said that he wants to paint a version of the wild that is romantic, and not necessarily realistic. “I paint refuges, places to go to for solace. I want my paintings to be destinations of quiet and calm,” he says. “However, this world is fragile.”

by CaroPosted on

San Francisco based artist Alexis Arnold has found a way to preserve her favorite old books as timeless treasures. Her crystallized book series ‘freezes’ books into stunning, mystical sculptures using an unlikely recipe: “I primarily use the laundry detergent, Twenty Mule Team Borax, to grow crystals on the various objects, but there are many household products that can be used to grow different types of crystals,” Arnold explains. Featured here on our blog, she has said that the reaction to her work varies, but often the growth of the crystals evokes nostalgia as many of her pieces preserve works of children’s fiction.

by CaroPosted on

It’s a warning sign at art galleries and museums around the world: “Don’t touch the artwork.” But one artist based in Laguna Beach, California wants you to do just that. Andrew Myers creates mixed media works with screws, oil paint, charcoal, bronze, cement, and found objects. “Distinct”, “expressive” and “tactile” are words he uses to describe his portraits made of thousands of screws (a single piece can use up to 10,000 or more), where touch is important to experiencing the work as it brings the subjects to life with volume and texture.

by CaroPosted on

Earlier today, we brought you photos from Saturday night’s opening of Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose, a bi-coastal collaboration between the magazine and Virginia MOCA. Now, we’d like to give you a closer look at the art and see what it’s like to walk through the halls of this unprecedented group of 51 new contemporary artists from all genres and corners of the world.

by CaroPosted on

Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose was born as a bi-coastal collaboration between contemporary art magazine Hi-Fructose based in San Francisco and the Virginia MOCA. Several years in the making, this exhibition celebrated the magazine’s first ten years on Saturday night by bringing highlights of some of today’s foremost contemporary artists who have appeared in its pages to Virginia Beach.