by Andy SmithPosted on

Min Liu, a Taiwan-born, Brooklyn-based animator/graphic designer, has posted dozens of red-hued animated GIFs in her Bloody Diary online. The ongoing project features hilarious animations, often full of cats (and several other beings) in surreal situations. The artist keeps her palette simple in this series, with reds, blacks, and negative space used for each creation.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Michael Dandley, an artist based in New Hampshire, crafts vibrant, transformative works out of the ordinary. At times, the artist is commenting on our impact on the natural world; elsewhere, he captures the engrossing beauty out of our sight. Though not all carry the surreal weight of his wilder images, all contain a certain serenity in the artist’s choices of palette and perspective.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Barnaby Barford’s “ME WANT NOW,” staged at David Gill Gallery in London, features a line-up of life-size, ceramic animal sculptures, but its implications are decidedly human. As they await the unknown, the gallery says the pieces represent a “a visual allegory of human existence.” The exhibit comes a year after his 20-foot-high “Tour of Babel” installation, comprised of 3,000 miniature buildings, inhabiting the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. Barford was first featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 8 and is part of the “Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose” at Virginia MOCA. “ME WANT NOW” runs through Dec. 21.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Inches away, the works of artist Chris Dorosz appear as what they are: paint drops on clear, acrylic rods. Yet, a few steps back, the sculptures form into everyday scenes among figures and other absorbing imagery. The narratives seem to float in the air, offering both visceral and delicate views of human interaction.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Rossina Bossio, born in Bogota, Colombia, crafts mixed-media portraits that contain symbolic flourishes and abstractions. Although the artist seems to focus primarily on women in her series like “Unidades Disponibles,” she intends to create conversations that explore the broader human condition. Or as her statement maintains, “imagining a utopian world where we will no longer need to talk about gender issues when facing images of women in galleries and museums.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Saya Woolfalk, a Japan-born, New York-based artist explores alternate realities with ongoing projects and bodies of work. With her sci-fi-influenced, fictional group of women, known as the Empathics, she rethinks hybridity, race, sex, and scientific understanding. The Empathics are conveyed in vibrant colors and otherworldly costumes and backdrops, and the characters have the power to meld themselves with plants and can change their genetic make-up. She uses several means to relay these ideas, from video and installation to painting and sculpture.