by CaroPosted on

Italian artist Carlo Fantin (featured here) uses the Catholic imagery from his devout upbringing as a metaphor for contemporary rituals. In particular, his hand-cut paper works address our unrelenting use of social media, where he likens bloggers and the media to shepherds whom we follow like a flock of sheep. His current exhibition, “U Have 2 Name Him Jesus #Annunciation” at Mercury 20 in Oakland, CA continues this play on religious iconography.

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German artists Jasmin Siddiqui and Falk Lehmann, aka “Herakut,” (covered here) have traveled all over the world to paint murals and exhibit their drippy, figurative paintings. Through recent social projects, they’ve shared experiences which have provided the inspiration for their current exhibition, “Displaced Thoughts”. On view at the studio and work space of Urban Nation, the exhibition paints a picture of “displaced” individuals due to persecution, conflict, and human rights violations. Herakut sheds a light on these people and the organizations designed to help them in the Middle East, Europe and Africa with new paintings, photographs and installations.

by CaroPosted on

The shape of a church is indefinitely sketched into the landscape in the latest project by architecture duo, Gijs Van Vaerenbergh. Comprised of Belgian architects Pieterjan Gijs and Arnout Van Vaerenbergh, their series of see-through churches, “Reading Between the Lines,” are not intended to be functional as shelter. They are more like sculptures that borrow design inspiration from local churches’ architecture in the area. See more after the jump!

by CaroPosted on

“An ancient mosaic looks exactly as intended by the artist who produced it over two millennia ago. What else can claim that kind of staying power? I find this idea simply amazing,” says street artist Jim Bachor. Bachor’s current series “Treats in the Streets” fills potholes in his home town of Chicago with playful mosaics of icecream and popsicles. Using the same materials as ancient craftsmen, they are made with thousands of colorful pieces of glass and marble set in mortar which protects each piece. The icecreams are part of an ongoing project where the artist takes pothole suggestions from his fans online, and then fills them with images of things like fish, candy, cereal, french fries, and words like “pothole.”

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Last week, Okuda San Miguel aka “Okuda” teamed up with fellow artist Yoh Nagao (featured here) in Berlin, Germany to create two vibrant new murals. The first is curated by international art project Urban Nation,  which can be found at their gallery location, and is Okuda’s abstract reinterpretation of the city’s symbol, “Berolina.” The Madrid based artist found inspiration in the statue that once stood in Alexanderplatz in honor of the victorious troops of the Franco-Prussian War. Originally, she wore a crown of oak leaves which Okuda has replaced with the famous Berlin Wall. This mural was followed by the duo’s second piece, “From Goya to Nagoya,” a private commission.

by CaroPosted on

On Saturday night, Tokyo based artist Yosuke Ueno celebrated his fourth solo exhibition at Thinkspace Gallery in Los Angeles with “Beautiful Noise.” Over his career, Ueno has built a fantastic, vibrant universe inhabited by characters like “Hapiko” and “Efil” (“Life”), inspired by Japanese spirits. Here, they find themselves joined by those familiar to Western audiences such as Charlie Brown and Mickey Mouse, decorated with elements of contemporary culture including glittery, graffiti motifs, and Pop iconography. Take a look at our photos from opening night after the jump.