by Elizabeth MaskaskyPosted on

American artists — from the painters of the Hudson River School to the influential Andrew Wyeth — have long depicted this country’s vast landscape as simultaneously a place of lonely desolation and of awe-inspiring grandeur. Following in this tradition, Andrea Kowch creates gorgeous and eerie acrylic paintings of open-skied pastoral landscapes. Inspired by a deep fascination with the natural world, Kowch’s works also tap into a common feeling of uneasiness many of us have toward the American rural – a place that is iconic for its beauty but that is also often associated with tedium, isolation and a clinging to negative aspects of the country’s past.

by CaroPosted on

On August 30th, CHG Circa will showcase some of their favorite artists in their second installment of “Art Collector Starter Kit”.  The show was first created in 2013 to give emerging artists a platform to express new ideas, while creating a smaller-sized ‘starter kit’ of sorts for new collectors.  This year highlights new faces to Circa’s walls like Yosuke Ueno (above), Yukino Fukumoto (covered here), Hikari Shimoda, who debuted last month, and So Youn Lee- paired with Circa regulars Brandi Milne, Shag, Lola, Natalia Fabia, and more.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

While his most well-known projects are his horror novels and short stories, Clive Barker has a long career as painter that will be surveyed in his new exhibition, “1977,” opening tomorrow night, August 23, at Century Guild in Culver City. The interdisciplinary artist — whose biggest credits include having his novels adapted for the Hellraiser and Candyman film series — will be showing a series of paintings he created in 1977 when he was 24 years old, as well as new works from this year. Filled with macabre imagery, Barker’s paintings have a bone-chilling quality while balancing horror with humor. Coinciding with the exhibition will be the release of Barker’s new art book, Imaginer.

by CaroPosted on

The dark and insanely detailed drawings of Laurie Lipton mix elements from different eras of art and time, including her own surreal version of reality.  When asked her to describe her meticulous, cross-hatching in one word,  she answered, “sick” (with a grin).  She has exhibited and lived all over the world from Holland, Germany, France, and recently London, where she spent time with the likes of Terry Gilliam, one of her favorite creatives. She will exhibit the art discussed here at Ace Gallery in Los Angeles next year.

by Sasha BogojevPosted on

Emerging NYC-based artist Lala Abaddon’s journey through the art world started with analog photography and poetry. The idea of creating works that carry more than one story always fascinated her, and Abaddon felt like she found the answer when she wove her first piece. Interested in the process of deconstruction and reconstruction, she decided to cut up multiple existing photographs and weave them into new images.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Calling it highly anticipated would be an understatement: even the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s website has a timer counting down the seconds until the US debut of David Bowie’s first museum retrospective, “David Bowie Is,” on September 23. The genre-defying artist has not only left a major mark on pop music, but the worlds of fashion, art, theater and design as well. The gigantic exhibition will pay homage to Bowie with immersive, multi-sensory installations, objects from Bowie’s life, his notebooks (where many lyrics were scrawled), photography, as well as elaborate costumes from his most prominent tours. Organized by the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the exhibition will offer a glimpse of five decades of David Bowie as a cultural phenomenon.