by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Opening November 29 at Feinkunst Krüger in Hamburg, Germany, “Don’t Wake Daddy IX” is a large group show featuring 29 prominent artists influenced by the Low Brow and Pop Surrealism movements. The figurative work in the show largely borrows for pop culture and illustration, focusing on mysterious, bizarre, and often grotesque imagery. Femke Hiemstra, Charlie Immer, Brendan Danielsson, and Ryan Heshka, whom we’ve featured in our print issues, are just a few of the many artists featured. The exhibition will be on view through December 20. Take a look at our preview before the show opens to the public this Saturday.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

John Bisbee envisions his sculptures as drawings in which the 12-inch nails he hammers and welds act like lines in three dimensions. Since his serendipitous discovery of nails’ sculptural potential 30 years ago, Bisbee has been working with the unusual industrial material. His body of work includes organic shapes and architectural constructions alike. The nails act as uniform building blocks that allow him to create rhythmic patterns that echo through much of his work, whether it’s a snake-like floor sculpture, a bird’s nest of bent nails, or a precariously high pyramid.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Minnesota-based artist, designer, and illustrator Teagan White finds inspiration in nature’s cyclical relationships. She bases her intricate illustrations on her meticulous observations of forest creatures in their habitats. Combining analog and digital means, White juxtaposes detailed line work with flat color fields. She renders fur, feathers, petals, and leaves with great detail, but the over-all feel of her work is design-oriented and stylized.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Using toy railroad tracks and other plastic miniatures, Japanese duo Paramodel created a playful, immersive installation currently on view at the University of Michigan Museum of Art (UMMA) in Ann Arbor. Titled “paramodelic graffiti,” the installation resembles a sculptural mural with its looping, calligraphic line work. The railroad tracks create the framework for abstract, tessellated shapes that line the walls from floor to ceiling. Composed of artists Yasuhiko Hayashi and Yûsuke Nakano, Paramodel began collaborating in 2001. “paramodelic graffiti” marks their first United States solo exhibition and will be on view through January 4, 2015.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Erika Sanada’s canine sculptures are both endearing and unnerving. There’s something sweet about her ceramic puppies (featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 31) despite their zombie eyes and pale, hairless skin. The dogs play, wrestle, and cuddle, but the ambiguous details in each sculpture make it possible to interpret their gestures as either tender or malicious, or perhaps a bit of both. Sanada began creating these creatures as a way of coping with anxiety. She says they represent dark elements of her mind she’s had to tame. The latest installment of her ongoing, autobiographical body of work will debut in her upcoming solo show, “Odd Things: Daydreaming,” which opens November 28 at Antler Gallery in Portland and runs through December 31.

by CaroPosted on

Photographer Allan Amato’s “Temple of Art” is a series of portraits of fine artists over two years in the making. His black and white images provided the canvas onto which the subject was encouraged to interpret his or her likeness. You could say these are artists who look like their art; Jasmine Worth shares the regal quality of her Madonnas, Danni Shinya Luo has the grace of her watercolors, and so on. Opening December 5th at La Luz de Jesus, their collaborative exhibition enhances their personal characteristics and quirks.