by CaroPosted on

Celebrating its fourth year, the Richmond Mural Project recently brought a new crop of international artists to Virginia. The project has a goal to create 100 murals in five years, making this year especially ambitious with many artists creating multiple pieces. We’ve covered previous installments here on the blog, where the project has featured murals by Chazme 718, Meggs, Onur, Ron English, Sepe, Smitheone, Ekundayo, Proch, David Flores and Wes21. On July 14th, they were joined by Caratoes, Clog two, D*Face, Evoca1, Inkten, James Bullough, Jason Woodside, Jerkface, Moya, Nils Westergard, and Taylor White.

by CaroPosted on

Throughout his forty-year career, the late artist Duane Hanson made lifelike sculptures that portrayed working class Americans. For the first time since his UK retrospective in 1997, Serpentine Galleries in London is showcasing a new selection of some of the sculptor’s key pieces. Hanson is credited as a major contributor to the hyperrealism movement. His art went on to inspire contemporary artists like Ron Mueck (covered here) and can be found in major museums and collections, such as the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C. and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York.

by CaroPosted on

Italian artist Luca Luce began his creative career as a designer, before eventually settling into the field of makeup art. The profession attracted him for its opportunities to create beauty and give other people a form of security. Now, turning the brush onto himself, Luce uses his creative skills to make optical illusions out of his left hand. Using well known cosmetic brands as his medium, he paints realistic pictures with a skewed perspective that can only be appreciated by the wearer. His illustrations portray things like small animals sleeping in the palm of his hand, pulled back skin to reveal electrical outlets, animated characters like Jack Skellington, and other combinations of fantasy and horror.

by CaroPosted on

Numbers of women artists still rank low in gallery rosters, less than 50 percent, across the world. With the exception of a few like Yayoi Kusama and Yoko Ono, women in the Japanese contemporary art world have yet to earn equal recognition. This is largely due to the historical conception that women were not suited to become professional artists. A new exhibition at Jiro Miura Gallery in Tokyo is bringing awareness to 19 emerging international women artists. “Ephemeral: Territory of Girls”, which opened on July 25th, showcases new works by Jana Brike, Amy Crehore, Virginia Mori, Ania Tomicka, Emi Adachi, Fuco Ueda, Kaori Ogawa, Miki Kato, Kimi Kuruhara, Kozue Kuroki, Satomi Kuwahara, Atsuko Goto, Yuka Sakuma, Minae Takada, Tsubaki Torii, Yumi Nakai, Yuko Nagami, Yuki Nagayoshi, Mao Hamaguchi, Miho Hirano, Shiori Matsumoto, Eri Mizuno, and Yuko Murai.

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Attention all artists! In partnership with our friends at Squarespace, Hi-Fructose will be highlighting five artists who are currently using Squarespace for their website or portfolio, to be featured on HiFructose.com. This week we are featuring Newcastle, England based artist Vanessa Foley, who expresses an affinity for wildlife in her realistic portraits of animals. She grew up in the Northumberland countryside surrounded by nature which left a lasting impression on her. In her artist statement, she writes, “My love of nature and art are inseparable, and I could never imagine one without the other.”

by CaroPosted on

The Centro de Arte Contemporáneo de Málaga (aka CAC Málaga) has increasingly included urban art in its program, starting with projects in the streets. In 2014, the museum invited D*Face and Shepard Fairey to paint two massive side by side murals. The pair returned to CAC Málaga on June 26th to present two adjoining exhibitions. Notably, D*Face’s “Wasted Youth” marks his first major solo museum debut in Spain. Growing up, the British artist felt stifled by the curriculum set forth by his parents and schooling, which considered anything outside the norm to be a waste of his youth. 15 years into his career, the artist looks backs with this exhibition as if to proclaim the value of following your passions.