by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Dave Kinsey debuts his new body of work, “Ashes to Ashes,” at Die Kunstagentin in Cologne, Germany on February 5. Known for his bold color palette of deep blues and aquatic teals with jarring, red accents, Kinsey went in an abstract direction with this new series of paintings. While humanoid characters are discernible, Kinsey only creates the slightest semblance of recognizable figures. Dabs of color coalesce into desolate landscapes with seemingly gigantic characters towering overhead. Because of Kinsey’s techniques, the narrative aspect of the work gets muffled and its formal qualities come to the forefront.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Indonesian artist Entang Wiharso explores the complex social milieu of his home country’s multicultural metropolises in his current solo show at Marc Straus Gallery in Manhattan, which is on view through February 8. “I depict the condition of humans who are often divided by complex, multilayered political, ethnic, racial, and religious systems: they co-exist yet their communication is limited and indirect,” wrote Wiharso about the show.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Frida Kahlo is not only an influential 20th-century artist — she’s an icon. Through the often painful, autobiographical threads in her life’s work, fans have come to embrace the late painter as a symbol of fearless self-expression and resilience. San Francisco’s Gauntlet Gallery pays homage to Kahlo with their group show, “Thank God It’s Frida,” which opens on January 31. Artists such as Valentin Fischer, David Slone, JeanPaul Mallozzi, Cheyenne Randall, Ruben Ireland, and many others paid homage to Kahlo’s brazen spirit and personal style with portraits of the artist. Alongside the exhibition, San Francisco artist D Young V will also debut his site-specific installation, “Forward Motion,” which takes over part of the gallery with floor-to-ceiling murals filled with D Young V’s signature, propaganda-style imagery.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Jacob Dahlgren treats stacks of pencils like blocks of wood in his sculpture series, “Subject of Art.” With each unit sharpened to a different length, the pencils stack on top of one another to create playful, geometric shapes with an Op Art element. Though the forms are quite simple, Dahlgren’s choice of medium makes the series a whimsical exploration of how one can reconfigure basic shapes to creates something new.

by CaroPosted on

Washington, DC. based artist Ashley Oubré creates compelling photoreal images with just carbon pencil, graphite and india ink. Her drawings capture private moments of shame and humiliation from insecurities that many of us face. As someone who once fought depression, she’s set out to embrace what society considers abnormal; obesity, stretch marks, age spots, and twisted spines. These are the characteristics that connect her subjects.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

As the name might suggest, Portland’s Antler Gallery showcases many artists whose work deals with the natural world. Their appreciation of animal-inspired art precipitated the annual exhibition, “Brink,” which is now in its third year. Opening on January 29, the group show features artists such as Chie Yoshii, Jon MacNair, Caitlin McCormack, Brin Levinson, Kevin Earl Taylor, and Antler owners Susannah Kelly and Neil Perry, among others. Part of the show’s proceeds will benefit the Audubon Society of Portland, which does work to protect the region’s birds and their habitats.