by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

While Billy Norrby’s previous work was soft and airy, evoking the Romanticist paintings of the 18th century, his latest series flashes forward a few centuries to a dystopian future that calls to mind the film Bladerunner or cult science fiction author Phillip K. Dick’s book covers. Norrby says he found inspiration in 1970s pulp sci-fi novels, vintage Soviet space race propaganda, and special effects from movies such as 2001. Titled “Pulsar,” some of the pieces in the new series will appear next at Jonathan LeVine Gallery in New York in August. Norrby just shared some images from this body of work with us. Check it out below.

by CaroPosted on

The work of Brooklyn based artist Li-Hill can be compared to a thunderstorm of images which dissipate into surrounding blank space. Like the element of “Carbon”, the title of his series currently on view at C.A.V.E. Gallery, Li-Hill’s illustrations break into tiny pieces that makeup a whole. The show is named after its inspiration. He chose to portray animals which are directly threatened by climate change due to carbon emissions. Jaguars, caribou, grizzly bears, wolves, and vultures are just a few represented in fleeting monochromatic graphite drawings smeared with aerosol, a carbon-concentrated material.

by CaroPosted on

Tomorrow night, Canadian artists Sarah Joncas and Camilla d’Errico bring together their colorful concepts of beauty in “Beauty in the Breakdown” at Thinkspace Gallery, Los Angeles. Their exhibition falls on the near 10 year anniversary of their first showing at Thinkspace, which showcased their complementary design sensibilities. Since then, both artists have developed in leaps and bounds stylistically, here portraying a spectrum of emotions in their portraits of women. Check out our preview after the jump.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Vintage pin-up girl images served as the inspiration for the group exhibit “Peep Show” at Stranger Factory in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The show pays homage to the classic, playfully sexy images with a series of works by Ryan Heshka, Sas Christian, Colin Christian, Jim Mahfood, Brian Ewing, Jasmine Becket-Griffith, Aunia Kahn, Tokyo Jesus, and Brandt Peters. The show comes down on March 1, so take a look at some of the works below or see it in person if you’re in the area.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Bubi Canal takes brightly colored, stylized photographs that cleverly utilize commonplace objects to create otherworldly scenarios. Through his whimsical vision, mundane items begin to resemble toys and the world, a playground. Canal will debut a new series of works for his solo show “Magic Garden,” opening at Munch Gallery in New York on March 14 and showing through April 19. Shot in NYC and Rochester, Canal’s latest photographs began as still lifes but quickly turned into quirky portraits with a unifying red, yellow, green, and blue color palette. In addition to photography, the show will also include video and sculpture.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Adonna Khare creates mural-scale pencil drawings inspired by the animal world. Anthropomorphized animals interact in mysterious forests shrouded in plants and overhanging branches. Khare’s work evokes Aesop’s Fables with its storybook-like narratives. While her drawings might appear allegorical, they are also open-ended and surreal. The artist won the 2012 Art Prize competition and has work in the permanent collections of the Long Beach Museum of Art and the Grand Rapids Art Museum.