by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Slimy skeletons find themselves captive in dark dungeons in Charlie Immer’s latest drawings and paintings. The artist (featured in HF Vol. 11) renders sinewy textures and jelly-like consistencies to make his viewers squirm. Immer currently has a show with Paul Pope on view at Cotton Candy Machine in Brooklyn through January 4. The exhibition features several new dark yet fluorescent paintings as well as a rare look at his drawings on paper.

by CaroPosted on

Jeremy “Tackyshack” Jackson is a light painter living in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, where his yard is now covered with snow and pond is iced over. We first shared his fantastical imagery back in January. Tackyshack’s dedication to light painting photography in the past year is inspiring. He’s seeing something that isn’t there, like a Christmas tree in his studio, and yet is all around us. His photos featured here take advantage of the winter ho-hum.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Emerging photographer Elizabeth Gadd travels the world with her friends and captures them amid awe-inspiring scenery in locales such as Iceland, Oregon, and Hawaii. The Vancouver-based artist is drawn to grandiose vistas from mountain tops, icy terrains, and unexpected patterns in geological formations and plant life. While she calls herself a landscape photographer, Gadd inserts characters in brightly-colored clothing in the distance of her compositions. They act as guides for the viewer to navigate the unfamiliar.

by CaroPosted on

Canadian artist Jamiyla Lowe has conjured a topsy turvy world of bizarre creatures. Her ink illustrations recall Dr. Seuss characters with attitude, using a handful of bright colors like yellow, red and green, or monochromatic black and white. They are rounded and somewhat droopy, even when representing real animals, and almost always with a white background. Most of the images here are from her new series, “Beware of the Beast” for Narwhal Art Projects in Toronto.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Costa Dvorezky paints human figures with broad, luxurious brushstrokes that leave traces of dripping paint throughout his work. Though characters are at the center, Dvorezky prioritizes his expressionistic painting style over creating a narrative. Backgrounds melt away into abstract markings that transport his men and women into an imaginary space where they appear to defy gravity. Their bodies float, swing, and tumble with the levity and grace of trained acrobats and dancers.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Trypophobia is the pathological fear of irregularly shaped holes. If looking at sponges, beehives, and raw meat makes you squirm, please look away. Colin Christian exploits people’s innate discomfort with porous organic matter in his new work for his January 3 solo show, “Trypophobia” at Stephen Romano Gallery in Brooklyn. While Christian’s doll-like sculptures have been featured on our blog many times, this is his most grotesque body of work yet. Toothy holes gnaw at the silicone flesh of his large-scale characters as if an alien parasite has invaded their bodies. Some of the sculptures feature close-ups of festering skin, which Christian displays in a medical fashion. He is clearly unafraid to repulse viewers with this exhibit.