by CaroPosted on

San Francisco based artist Jeremy Mann captures the exciting air of his hometown in his dynamic oil landscapes. His “Cityscapes” series portrays the city from bustling, bird’s-eye views to its more mundane and quiet street corners at night, all flickering with glitchy dabs of paint that makes his art appear digital, though it is a description he rejects. It’s a common misconception that perhaps stems from his process, where he references “jumbled up” digital manipulations of his own photographs.

by CaroPosted on

Patti Warashina is a Pacific Northwest based artist known for her imaginative ceramic sculptures that are full of wit and sarcasm. At age 76, she does not stop inventing. Featured here on our blog, her clay figures are usually placed in fantasy environments, where she uses sculpture to explore such themes as the human condition, feminism, car-culture, and political and social topics.

by CaroPosted on

It’s a common belief that twins share some sort of unexplained mental, even spiritual connection. Identical twin brothers and artists How and Nosm (Raoul and Davide Perre) were raised together and also sharing the passion for art, have a connection and dynamic that is unique. It certainly explains their highly singular vision: dynamic artworks and massive, global murals that are instantly recognizable for their use of red, black and white based imagery featuring intricate patterns and shapes.

by CaroPosted on

For Toronto based artist Brian Donnelly, featured here, painting is a risky business. At first beautifully rendered in oil, he then sprays his subjects with turpentine and hand sanitizer until their faces are distorted beyond recognition, to a more limited expression. Donnelly’s work is all about embracing limitations: “I ask a lot of questions about art and how we define it,” he says. “How far away from the original state can we go before we stop calling something art? In the process, I end up drawing a parallel between the fragile nature of artwork and the human condition.”

by CaroPosted on

Carole A. Feuerman’s hyperrealistic sculptures of graceful human subjects like swimmers, divers, and dancers, featured here, are undeniably lifelike. But they are also magical in their dreamy state. Her sculptures also capture something that isn’t real in the tangible sense, and that is the soul and emotion of a living person. Some call it “super-realism”, but in Feuerman’s words: “My sculptures combine both reality and illusion- I’m idealizing the human form, its not life as it really is.”

by CaroPosted on

Klaus Enrique is a New York based photographer whose work parallels Italian painter Giuseppe Arcimboldo and has come to adopt the term “Arcimboldist” for his expression. His creepy, amusing, nevertheless stunning portraits capture subjects made from real objects, fruits, and vegetables that realize Arcimboldo’s paintings in real life. At first glance, it might appear as though Enrique’s work is created digitally, but they are actually photographs of sculptures made out of real organic elements, also making Enrique a sculptor.