by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Jason Borders’s carved animal skulls are morbidly fascinating. While the ornate, lace-like patterns he engraves into the bone draw viewers in with their beauty, it’s easy to become repulsed when you truly think about the origins of his materials. “A large part of what I do involves a familiarization with death,” he says. “My belief is that, as painful as it can be, looking directly at death helps you to live your life with intent and purpose.” While, in Western culture, we tend to remove death as far away from ourselves as possible, perhaps a more holistic way of thinking about it is to view it as part of our existence. In using animal remains to create something new, Borders’ work reminds viewers of the cyclical nature of life.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Brazilian artist Luciano Scherer paints miniature-looking towns run amuck with mysterious visitors. Houses grow legs, winged demons swoop in through the trees, and tiny, dog-like monsters frolic. “I believe in the unsaid, in the inkling, in the doubt and in the estrangement,” he writes in his artist statement. His work impart a feeling of unease and uncertainty as viewers attempt to parse together what is happening. The beauty, however, lies in the mystery.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

A veritable expert on the subject of recycling, Czech artist Veronika Richterova uses PET bottles to create whimsical sculptures that are visually appealing and educational. PET bottles are the common, plastic bottles in which most soft drinks are sold. While easy to recycle and remake into other items, most people associate these bottles with pollution in the world’s landscapes and oceans. With her imaginative sculptures, Richterova inspires her viewers to reconsider the waste they put into the environment and find creative, new uses of their discarded items. Check out her cactus-inspired plastic bottle sculptures below.

by CaroPosted on

There is a world of hidden meaning in classic children’s literature that dates back centuries. Tales like Cinderella, Hansel and Gretel, and Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland explore dark and sometimes violent themes, in counterpart to the friendlier The Cat in the Hat and Winnie-the-Pooh. These stories provide the inspiration of Modern Eden Gallery’s upcoming group show “Storybook: An Art Journey Through Childhood” opening on April 25th. Curated by the Warholian’s Michael Cuffe, the exhibition features over 65 artists including Jasmine Becket-Griffith, Ciou, Jana Brike, Leilani Bustamante, Steve Chmilar, Aunia Kahn, Edith Lebeau, Calvin Ma, David Natale, Lori Nelson, Richard James Oliver, Peca, Michael Ramstead, Isabel Samaras, Erika Sanada, Hannah Yata, just to name a few.

by Hi-Fructose StaffPosted on

We’ve just received a box of issues of Hi-Fructose Vol. 34 signed by cover artist Margaret Keane herself! We will be making these available on Thursday at noon PST in our online store. Hi-Fructose will donate 100% of the proceeds to UNICEF. Only 40 of these issues will be available for purchase, with a limit of two per person. Thanks very much to Margaret and the Keane Eyes Gallery for making this possible.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

It seems that everything Tempe, Arizona-based artist Travis Rice touches turns to rainbow. In his paintings and installations, Rice entices viewers with colorful, abstract shapes that respond to geometry and architecture. His enormous, multicolored paper installations have been a hallmark of his shows over the past few years. With these waterfalls of shredded paper suspended from the ceiling, Rice alters the way that viewers interact with an otherwise ordinary gallery space. While these works are soft and amorphous, his paintings are more rigorous studies of form and depth. Shard-like rainbow shapes seem to explode outwards towards the viewer, creating layers of contrasting colors and textures.