by CaroPosted on

England based artist Dylan Andrews uses light and shadow to portray emotion in his drawings. His monochromatic charcoal portraits build up to a dramatic intensity that is almost surreal. Owing to the drama and atmosphere in his pieces is the use of black and white high contrast of tones. Pattern and texture is another aspect of the work that he uses to explore the emotional possibilities. The shadows on his young subjects’ extend the reality of the image beyond the page, a reflection from an object we cannot see. 

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Italy based street artist Teo Pirisi, known as “Moneyless”, is constantly seeking to evolve his already abstract style of work. For his last major solo exhibition (covered here), he sought inspiration in geometrical shapes and patterns. These, he feels, are the fundamentals of life that at their core represent a multitude of possibility. As such, they appear throughout his graffiti writing, painting, drawings and found object installations. For his current exhibition, “Fragmentations,” at BC Gallery in Berlin, Moneyless reduces this concept to its most simplified form.

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Greg ‘Craola’ Simkin’s childhood memories have long played an important role and inspiration for his artwork. The playfulness of being a child comes together with creatures of the natural world in his mythical landscapes. He calls this world “the Outside”, a place where the impossible becomes possible, and a cast of anthropomorphized animals set out on bizarre adventures. Simkins expands on this world in his upcoming solo exhibition, “Where Am I?” at KP Project/MKG, opening Saturday.

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Figurative and boldly colored, Christina West makes sculptures that combine both serious and playful subject matter. Often, she employs scale to disorient her viewer and emphasize a certain sense of isolation. West contradicts their feeling of quiet loneliness with her loud palette. She paints her sculptures in a hot pink or bold white, a reference to the classical figures that inspire her. Take a look at her latest series, “Intimate Strangers”, after the jump.

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One could say that Surrealism as a movement is a way for artists to seek distraction from the mundane and engage in fantasy. On his current exhibition at AFA Gallery, painter Daniel Merriam shares, “Although I may be guilty of a little denial, it’s enabled me to go to the edge and back, which is kind of where people expect an artist to go.” Spanning over 20 new watercolor paintings, titled “Now You See Me: The Art of Escapism”, he allows himself to overcome the limitations of reality in this latest series.

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Shepard Fairey (interviewed here) is now working on his largest mural to date in Detroit. Located at ONE Campus Martius at “the Belt” and measuring 180′ x 60′ feet, it is a permanent fixture to the area playing host to his upcoming solo exhibition, “Printed Matters”. Opening this Friday at Library Street Collective, the show will feature a variety of Fairey’s latest printed materials, serigraphs on paper, collage, and editions on paper and metal. Check out our coverage of the mural in progress after the jump.