by Andy SmithPosted on


Artist Emma Hopkins describes her work as painting “people from the inside out.” This idea seems to work on both physical and emotional levels, as her arresting portraits and meditations are teeming with vulnerability. Her subjects are often unclothed, and even when she focuses on isolated body parts or strips off their skin, humanity is present.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Amy Hill – “Apathy”

New York-based artist Amy Hill puts her contemporary spin on the work of 15th century painter Hans Memling in her series of oil paintings titled Seven Deadly Sins. Hill is known for adapting the styles of early Dutch and Flemish Renaissance painting and placing historical subjects within modern day settings. On her website, the artist writes, “I chose these eras because of my stylistic kinship with their artists, which allows me to carry on a kind of dialogue with them… I have chosen portraiture as it is a genre that runs through art history and allows me through poses, gestures and fashion detail to make social, psychological and anthropological statements about my subjects.”

by Margot BuermannPosted on


San Francisco-based visual artist Nicholas Bohac contemplates “the big picture” in his immersive, mixed media works that feature celestial figures amidst dreamlike landscapes. In his artist statement, Bohac writes that his purpose is “to question the universe and where, exactly, people fit into it… Through my work, I aim to explore the overall phenomenon of what it means to be human, past, present and future.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Calling his surreal paintings “suspended moments,” artist Erik Thor Sandberg captures ongoing narratives that exist before and after the scene in question. Whether it’s a towering skeleton consuming flesh or a fairytale-like jaunt between fantasy creatures, Sandberg’s paintings offer both whimsy and unsettling spectacle. He was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Chromagrain, the latest exhibition from Svper Ordinary Gallery in Denver, brings together the stunning art of Blaine Fontana (featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 36) and David Rice (last covered on our blog here). The new works are currently on view through the end of September. View more images from the exhibition here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Zadok Ben-David, a London-based artist, chose a direct title for his latest body of work: “All the people that I saw but never met.” Yet, when you see the crowd of sculptures amassed by the artist, the work takes on a metaphysical quality. Each of the individuals, created from painted stainless steel and perspex boxes, represents a distinct personality and a new, potential relationship that never was.