by CaroPosted on

San Francisco based artist Alexis Arnold has found a way to preserve her favorite old books as timeless treasures. Her crystallized book series ‘freezes’ books into stunning, mystical sculptures using an unlikely recipe: “I primarily use the laundry detergent, Twenty Mule Team Borax, to grow crystals on the various objects, but there are many household products that can be used to grow different types of crystals,” Arnold explains. Featured here on our blog, she has said that the reaction to her work varies, but often the growth of the crystals evokes nostalgia as many of her pieces preserve works of children’s fiction.

by CaroPosted on

It’s a warning sign at art galleries and museums around the world: “Don’t touch the artwork.” But one artist based in Laguna Beach, California wants you to do just that. Andrew Myers creates mixed media works with screws, oil paint, charcoal, bronze, cement, and found objects. “Distinct”, “expressive” and “tactile” are words he uses to describe his portraits made of thousands of screws (a single piece can use up to 10,000 or more), where touch is important to experiencing the work as it brings the subjects to life with volume and texture.

by CaroPosted on

Earlier today, we brought you photos from Saturday night’s opening of Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose, a bi-coastal collaboration between the magazine and Virginia MOCA. Now, we’d like to give you a closer look at the art and see what it’s like to walk through the halls of this unprecedented group of 51 new contemporary artists from all genres and corners of the world.

by CaroPosted on

Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose was born as a bi-coastal collaboration between contemporary art magazine Hi-Fructose based in San Francisco and the Virginia MOCA. Several years in the making, this exhibition celebrated the magazine’s first ten years on Saturday night by bringing highlights of some of today’s foremost contemporary artists who have appeared in its pages to Virginia Beach.

by CaroPosted on

In October 2015, Hi-Fructose Vol. 29 featured artist Olek visited the Virginia MOCA for a special workshop with community members and to plan a large-scale public artwork on site that will raise awareness about the waters near Virginia Beach. Over the weekend, the New York-based artist’s project was unveiled at the opening of Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose – a larger than life future New York Times article covering the facade of the museum entrance. Olek’s mural, crocheted in a photo-realistic style, imagines our Earth Day headline news in 2020.

by CaroPosted on

Hi-Fructose Vol. 23 featured artist Mark Dean Veca’s colorful, dynamic paintings pop off the page in bright red, orange, and turquoise hues, with curvaceous lines inspired by the underground comic world. His work incorporates everything from pop culture references like Tony the Tiger and Scrooge McDuck to Americana elements like the Lincoln Memorial to the American Flag, to religious iconography including skulls, Buddhas, and Ganeshas – all filtered through his own gaze. The Los Angeles based artist is now in Virginia, where we’ve invited him to create special installation for the Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose, opening tonight at Virginia MOCA.