by Andy SmithPosted on

Oil painter Lindsay Pickett crafts distorted cityscapes that are at times taken from the artist’s dreams. His influences range from Dali and Bosch to sci-fi illustrators like Wayne Barlowe and Jim Burns. The key to crafting these pieces is not just subverting physics, Pickett says, but walking the tightrope of making them somehow convincing.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Evan Lovejoy’s paintings are inspired by both the artist’s love of the natural world and his anguish due to its destruction. Our complicated relationship with animals is shown through the artist’s varying ways of depicting them. Within the same work, a beast moves between a sense of realism, cartoonish rendering, and a more pop-surrealist sensibility.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Kensuke Koike’s ongoing “Single Image Processing” series, the artist alters vintage photographs and postcards with both humorous and surreal results. With just a pair of scissors, the artist is able to remix and recontextualize imagery that is otherwise ordinary or nostalgia-fueled.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Colombian illustrator Carolina Rodriguez Fuenmayor crafts riveting, cerebral scenes. Though her work often features solitary figures, much of her themes seem to stem from a universal sensibility. And in much of her work, unexpected hues and amorphous, enveloping forms underscore the works’ psychological nature.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Slime punks The Manx has teamed up with Hi-Fructose for some ultra rare and bizarre knickknacks! Snag a signed copy of The Manx’s new record MALIBU SLIME, featuring photographer Parker Day, Justin Roiland (co-creator of Adult Swim’s Rick and Morty), and The Locust’s Justin Pierson, handmade SLUG BOY action dolls, a discography (on VHS), and more! Apologies are made in advance for getting you fired/kicked out of school (you didn’t like it there anyways). The Manx signed and special bundles only in the Hi-Fructose MICRO Mega Store, while they last.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Francesco Barocco’s sculptures reconsider art history through conflicting modes, pairing elegant 2-dimensional forms with malformed sculptural material that would have once held the subject’s likeness. The effect is both striking and eeries, as the ancient figures appear contemplative in some works, and in agony in others.