by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

“Expatriation and exile fracture forever any sense of belonging and any hope of ever being complete,” wrote curator Octavio Zaya in his statement for Hayv Kahraman’s solo show at Jack Shainman Gallery in New York, “How Iraqi Are You?” Kahraman’s autobiographical paintings on linen ruminate on her early childhood in Iraq, her upbringing as a refugee in Sweden, and her struggle of navigating two disparate cultural identities.

by CaroPosted on

Japanese painter Fuyuko Matsui has made a big name for herself among Neo-Nihonga or “New Japanese” artists. She was recently named one of 2014’s most influential people by Nikkei Business, and is the first woman to receive a doctoral degree in Japanese painting (the first male was Takashi Murakami). Her artwork blends uniquely Japanese traditional painting techniques with dramatic subject matter. Check out more of her work after the jump.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Johnie Thornton is a self-taught artist based in LA whose solo show “Confabulation” recently premiered at Moen Mason Gallery in Tuscan, AZ. A series of paintings on birch panels, Thornton’s latest work explores abstract, geometric designs with figurative subjects occasionally thrown into the mix. His blue-skinned characters appear amid the patterns like disembodied holograms and become part of the refracted prisms floating in the composition. Though Thornton’s work appears somewhat sleek and futuristic, his colors and materials tie it back to age-old folk art forms.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Illustrious fantasies unravel in the “Dreamlands” group show, opening at Corey Helford Gallery’s CHG Circa space on March 14. Guest curator Caro (who is also our Hi-Fructose staff blogger) brings her Japanese Pop Art-inspired aesthetic to the show; she works with many of the featured artists, like So Youn Lee and Hikari Shimoda, through her arts platform Sweet Streets. The exhibition features 35 artists, many of whom our readers will recognize, such as Naoto Hattori, Tom Bagshaw, Hannah Faith Yata, Lola, Kazuki Takamatsu (HF Vol. 33 cover artist), and many others. The artists in the show were invited to interpret their dreams, and the resulting work is soft, utopian, and surreal.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

While Billy Norrby’s previous work was soft and airy, evoking the Romanticist paintings of the 18th century, his latest series flashes forward a few centuries to a dystopian future that calls to mind the film Bladerunner or cult science fiction author Phillip K. Dick’s book covers. Norrby says he found inspiration in 1970s pulp sci-fi novels, vintage Soviet space race propaganda, and special effects from movies such as 2001. Titled “Pulsar,” some of the pieces in the new series will appear next at Jonathan LeVine Gallery in New York in August. Norrby just shared some images from this body of work with us. Check it out below.

by CaroPosted on

The work of Brooklyn based artist Li-Hill can be compared to a thunderstorm of images which dissipate into surrounding blank space. Like the element of “Carbon”, the title of his series currently on view at C.A.V.E. Gallery, Li-Hill’s illustrations break into tiny pieces that makeup a whole. The show is named after its inspiration. He chose to portray animals which are directly threatened by climate change due to carbon emissions. Jaguars, caribou, grizzly bears, wolves, and vultures are just a few represented in fleeting monochromatic graphite drawings smeared with aerosol, a carbon-concentrated material.