by Andy SmithPosted on

Over the past year, pop surrealist Mark Ryden has tackled an unlikely new medium: ballet. Ryden designed the sets and costumes for the new American Ballet Theatre production “Whipped Cream.” The so-called “two-act confection” is based off the Richard Strauss-penned libretto “Schlagobers,” which was first performed in 1924 by the Vienna State Opera.The show kicks off on March 15 at Segerstrom Center for the Arts in Costa Mesa.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Chad Knight’s vibrant digital art moves between the meditative and the frenetic. A 3D designer with Nike by the day, the artist’s personal work seems to exist in alien worlds, with his works being made in Cinema 4D. These are places inhabited enormous, elaborate beings that appear in mid-evolution. The artist posts a new creation each day on his Instagram account, part of an ongoing, prolific effort.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Puerto Rican artist Cristina Toro creates intricate acrylic paintings and collages that often explore both the interior and our connections to the outside world. Her works appear as both surreal and personal revelations, as the artist often sets out with no final image in mind. In a new show at LaCa Projects in Charlotte, N.C., these ideas take on grand forms in works like the enormous “Without Exception Everything is Reflected in this Mirror,” at 12 feet by 9 feet. The piece itself took her more than a year to complete.

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French artist Tof Vanmarque crafts surreal worlds in his acrylic paintings. These fictional characters exist in a world devoid of physics, muted clothing, and in many cases, body parts. The artist’s work tends to exist against scenic, yet rundown backdrops, possibly victim to the insane characters that inhabit them.

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Both curious and unsettling, Kate Clark’s sculptures blend humanity and beings from the animal kingdom in wholly new creature. Using a mix of actual animal hides, foam, clay, rubber eyes, and other materials, the artist explores both history and our relationship to nature with each piece. The Brooklyn-based sculptor’s works have been featured in venues across the globe.

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At the National Art Center in Tokyo, Emmanuelle Moureaux helps the spot mark its 10th anniversary with the installation “Forest of Numbers.” This “symbolization of the next 10 years to come” consists of more than 60,000 suspended numbers, with a path cut through the work so that visitors can immerse themselves inside of the “forest.” The 10 layers of the piece represents a decade, with 4 digits that represent years between 2017 and 2026. Moreso, 100 shades of hues were used in the installation. It took 300 volunteers to pull off the work.