by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Erika Sanada’s canine sculptures are both endearing and unnerving. There’s something sweet about her ceramic puppies (featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 31) despite their zombie eyes and pale, hairless skin. The dogs play, wrestle, and cuddle, but the ambiguous details in each sculpture make it possible to interpret their gestures as either tender or malicious, or perhaps a bit of both. Sanada began creating these creatures as a way of coping with anxiety. She says they represent dark elements of her mind she’s had to tame. The latest installment of her ongoing, autobiographical body of work will debut in her upcoming solo show, “Odd Things: Daydreaming,” which opens November 28 at Antler Gallery in Portland and runs through December 31.

by CaroPosted on

Photographer Allan Amato’s “Temple of Art” is a series of portraits of fine artists over two years in the making. His black and white images provided the canvas onto which the subject was encouraged to interpret his or her likeness. You could say these are artists who look like their art; Jasmine Worth shares the regal quality of her Madonnas, Danni Shinya Luo has the grace of her watercolors, and so on. Opening December 5th at La Luz de Jesus, their collaborative exhibition enhances their personal characteristics and quirks.

by CaroPosted on

“I think listening to some songs can be a lot like looking at a painting. The meaning can vary greatly depending on who’s listening and what they’re feeling at the time and where they’re at in their lives. I love the idea of something being so open to interpretation,” shares Nate Frizzel on his recent show at CHG Circa, “Dark Was The Night”. The show borrows very loose inspiration from 1920s gospel song, “Dark is the Night”. It is what paved the direction Frizzel wanted to go in. The rest, he leaves to the beholder. Photos from opening night after the jump!

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Russian paper-cut artist Asya Kozina recently created an ornate array of white wedding dresses inspired by Mongolian folkloric fashion designs. Though they resemble haute couture, the sculptural outfits are made entirely from paper. The St. Petersburg-based artist described the traditional Mongolian garments as “futuristic.” Her versions exaggerate their shapes and emphasize their geometric structure by removing the color. Kozina collaborated with photographer Anastasia Andreeva on a shoot featuring models donning her baroque pieces.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Artist duo Nonotak (composed of Noemi Schipfer and Takami Nakamoto) creates spellbinding audio-visual installations using simple arrangements of light reflections. As viewers step up to gaze within the large panes of glass at the facade of the structure, they encounter a seemingly endless vortex that appears to reach into a world beyond. Combined with Nonotak’s audio compositions, their high-intensity visuals transform the mundane spaces they inhabit into something more otherworldly. We previously featured their installation “DAYDREAM V.2″ on the blog and today we bring you the latest work in the series, “DAYDREAM V.4,” which was shown at MU in Eindhoven, Netherlands earlier this month.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Will Cotton’s paintings take the viewer into confectionary, celestial wonderlands where voluptuous cumulous clouds are made of cotton candy. The New York-based artist asks his viewers to suspend disbelief and enter his sweet, sticky paradise populated by model-esque women. In this land of milk and honey, cake decorations and macaroons constitute proper dress code. His human subjects, however, often stare off into the distance with melancholy expressions, suggesting that this dreamworld may not be as idyllic as it seems at first glance.