by Andy SmithPosted on

This month, Rob Sato returns to Giant Robot with a new body of work under the title “Arco Iris.” These watercolor works tackle the differing significance of rainbows through several lenses. (Sato’s work is part of the upcoming Hi-Fructose Collected 4 box set, here.) The gallery and company says that this new show “marks another radical shift in style for the artist.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Using acrylic nails and hand-stitched sequins, Frances Goodman explores the concept of female identity in her portraits and sculptures. A new show at Richard Taittinger Gallery, titled “Beneath Her,” collects the South African artist’s most recent works around this journey. Goodman was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

This month, Copro Gallery in Santa Monica once again pays homage to Mexican director Guillermo del Toro, helmer of horror-tinged films like Hellboy, Pacific Rim, Pan’s Labyrinth, and others. “Inspirations, Curiosities & Other Oddities” collects work from more than 50 artists. In turn, the show also pays tribute to the names that influenced Del Toro: Edgar Allen Poe, HP Lovecraft, Mary Shelley, and others.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Haroshi‘s figures, made from used skateboard decks, appear to be getting massive in size. But in fact, the gallery holding them is miniature. The 20-inch sculptures are part of the new Arsham/Fieg Gallery‘s first show at the Kith Manhattan flagship store. Alongside his figures are what appear to be 3D-printed versions of the gallery’s namesakes, artists Daniel Arsham and Ronnie Fieg.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Whether rendered life-sized in resin and paint or smaller and 3D-printed, Nicholas Crombach’s figures explore our ties to the creatures of the natural world. The Canadian-born artist uses 3D printing as an extension of his past work and purpose, in a time when the contemporary tool is often used to create novelty items and irreverent, one-note sculptures. Services like Shapify have made the reaction of the human body a superficial process, while Crombach tackles something much older in nature.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Paul Cristina’s arresting works use charcoal, acrylics, and oils on paper mounted on the canvas. The Cleveland-born, self-taught artists evolved his style from the study of books, music, films, photographs, and people he’s encountered. The artist is currently based in Charleston, S.C.