by CaroPosted on

With the invent of GPS technology and map applications, paper maps are waning in use – but they are an essential material to English artist Ed Fairburn, who uses them as the canvas of his detailed portraits. Fairburn’s work is an imaginative incorporation of the human form and topography. He’s used maps of places from all over the world. The winding layouts of streets and rivers are enhanced to form wrinkles, veins, and other features of his subjects’ faces.

by CaroPosted on

Spanish artist Lita Cabellut paints 17th century Spanish and Dutch Baroque inspired portraits that are larger than life. A visit to Madrid’s Prado Museum when she was young affected her deeply, where she first saw the works of Diego Velázquez, Francisco Goya and Frans Hals. She captures the spirit of those old master paintings in a fresh way using a mixture of traditional fresco technique with a combined palette of muted colors with spots of vibrancy.

by Nathan SpoorPosted on

Conrad Roset is a watercolor and ink artist based out of his studio in Barcelona, Spain. Roset, who was profoundly influenced at a young age by the enigmatic Expressionist, Egon Scheile, explores the sensuality and fragility of the feminine form. Roset’s new paintings are a continuation of his “Muses” project, in which the artist searches for beauty in the effects of the watercolor and black India ink washes.

by Roxanne GoldbergPosted on

Tunisian artist Atef Maatallah paints people on grainy, monotone backgrounds to highlight the inner worlds of his characters. Maatallah often paints diptychs, in which one panel features only a single object such as a tea pot or small animal. Purposely separated from the human figures, the objects serve as outer manifestations of the peoples’ fears or desires. For example, an elderly woman with sun-baked sunken cheeks watches with a solemn expression as the feathers of a skinned bird — its’ complexion the same color as the woman’s — float downwards. In another image, a forlorn mother looks down as her two children sleep; one in her arms, the other slouched against her back. In the background, a bare light bulb hangs. The light is out.

by CaroPosted on

South Korean illustrator and cartoonist Kim Jung Gi draws energetic and fantastical scenes inspired by a mix of comics, movies, and his everyday encounters. His drawings became a Youtube sensation when he posted this timelapse video of his process, where he sketches incredibly without hesitation or visual references. Using primarily brush pen and ink, he works purely from his imagination, often distorting his images as if looking through a fish-eye lens.

by CaroPosted on

Next Friday, La Luz de Jesus gallery in Hollywood will dot their walls with thousands of coasters for the third year in a row. As most artists will tell you, it is the smallest works that are the most challenging to create. In the case of the Coaster Show, where the coasters measure 4″ inches round, they require confidence in one’s technique and precision. Their sizes aren’t the only aspect of the show that is small. The affordability of the works attracted hundreds of fans to last year’s show, who scrambled to get a piece by one of their favorite artists. This year, that list includes well-known names alongside emerging talents.