by Andy SmithPosted on

Shawn Huckins combines Internet culture and 18th- and 19th- century style portraits in his work. He offers a new collection of large acrylic paintings in “Athenaeum (I Can’t Pretend That This Is Poetry,” an upcoming show at Seattle’s Foster/White Gallery. The artist was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 32, and he was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Michelle Avery Konczyk’s painted scenes use elements from the human body and the natural world, with absorbing and unsettling results. The works are often rendered in watercolor on paper mounted to panel for both a delicate, moody sensibility. The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In a new collection of paintings and drawings, Kevin Cyr pays tribute to the working class via worn vehicles spotted and documented around New York City. “Labor Day” at Jonathan Levine Projects in New Jersey progresses the artist’s love affair with the concept of what vehicles say about the people who drive them. Cyr first appeared in the pages of this magazine in Hi-Fructose Vol. 10, and he’s part of the “Turn the Page: The First 10 Years of Hi-Fructose” exhibit, currently at Crocker Art Museum.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jess Johnson’s drawings and mixed-media works are meticulous in design, yet wild and otherworldly in content. Throughout her work, the New Zealand-born artist implements text to help provide more information and riddles about these strange worlds. Her new show at New York’s Jack Hanley Gallery, “Everything not saved will be lost,” collects these works, plus large-scale and absorbing installations.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Spanish artist Liqen somehow moves between the paper and the public wall without compromising his intricate, absorbing linework. His wild creations often carry surreal sensibilities and a hidden treasure in every corner. The artist’s work tends to be influenced by an early passion in nature, and in specific, the diversity of species and sights it provides.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Amy Casey’s acrylic paintings take elements of the urban landscape and creates monstrosities and hulking, twisted versions of the city. Her newest works are collected in show at Zg Gallery in Chicago titled “Critical Mass.” The paintings in this show highlight the artist’s talent for engrossing detail and controlled chaos. The show kicks off this weekend.