by Andy SmithPosted on


James Jean

Coming this July, it’s the 48th volume of Hi-Fructose!
This issue’s features include: the ceramic sculptures of Katherine Morling, the noir paintings of Troy Brooks, the paintings of Aylin Zaptçioglu, the geometric utopian world of Tishk Barzanji. Then we discover the rolled newspaper sculptures of animals by Hitotsuyama Studio, and then we get a history of industrial art pioneers Survival Research Laboratories, followed by the awkwardly humourous paintings of Jang Koal, the sculptures of Samuel Salcedo, and the surreal paintings of Bruno Pontiroli and Lola Gil. Plus a special 16-page glossy insert section dedicated to the recent paintings and stain glass work of this volume’s cover artist James Jean!

Pre-order a copy of the issue here, and you can subscribe to Hi-Fructose here in the U.S. and in Canada here.

Click through to see more previews of our next print volume.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Amir H. Fallah‘s acrylic paintings are portraits of immigrants in Los Angeles, carrying vibrant, varying textures and obscured figures. His new show at Denny Gallery, “How Far We’ve Come,” collects the latest work in this ongoing series. The show runs through June 17 at the New York City space.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Jeff Gillette’s paintings juxtapose the ruinous landscapes of shanty towns with the flourishes of Disney theme parks. In a new show at Copro Gallery, titled “Worst Case Scenario,” the artist’s latest explorations are shown. The show runs through July 7 at the Santa Monica space. Gillette was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Nicola Samorì’s paintings and sculptures recreate the elegance of the Baroque and then physically deconstruct it, baring the layers that lie below. The artist’s process is a highly technical one, based on the techniques of the Old Masters, and then scraping, slashing, or tearing for something wholly contemporary.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Leon Keer’s realistic paintings toy with depth, each a startling, larger-than-life recreation. In recent gallery work, the artist’s pieces take a nostalgic, and at times, playful turn. Yet, within the oversized Matchbox car and playful Gummy bear-packed Vicodin box, there are deeper perspectives being shared. The artist’s practice includes both street work and more traditional settings.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The vulnerable, fantastical oil paintings of Scott G. Brooks offer both narratives and raw portraiture. Though the artist has a knack for large-scale, intricate scenes, he can pack immense power in his single-character works. Brooks was last featured on our website here. In a statement, the artist talks about where his paintings come from.