by Andy SmithPosted on

Themes of science and introspection permeate throughout the oil paintings created by Romanian artist Victor Fota. His current body of work, “Human Extension,” progresses those ideas by exploring relationships between man and machine. The result is a surreal experience entangled in reality and science fiction.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Dubbing themselves “professional spraycationers,” Yok & Sheryo inject pops of cartoon joy into everyday life. Their Fruit and Vegetables La-la land in Singapore is an explosive example of what happens when the pair can run wild, tapping both their inner-children and actual youth from the area to make the creations. Their work can also be seen on public walls across the world, and on Instagram—documenting their adventures under the moniker “spacecandy.” They were last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Instinctual Feast is the latest series by Tanmaya Bingham, comprised of five mixed-media works that explore the many facets and faces of human connection. Specifically, the series represents ideas of ecstasy, pining, pleasure, compassion, and lust – all intrinsic parts of a deeply personal yet universally understood experience.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Ben Howe’s haunting images of broken, sliced and shredded faces may resemble digitally altered photographs, yet they are actually oil paintings rendered on canvas and board. Part of his ongoing series titled Surface Variations, the paintings are not only visually startling, but also deeply reflective on the nature of human consciousness — challenging our perception of the human form and exploring concepts of fractured memory and identity. The latest additions to the series are currently featured in Transmogrify, a group exhibition at the beinArt Gallery, until July 19.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Faces meld together; severed, broken hands are fixed in gripped positions. These are sculptures by Los Angeles artist Sarah Sitkin, who crafts unsettling, occasionally grotesque works made with materials like silicone, resin, latex, plaster, and clay. It’s not that the artist is trying to shock, even if some of the imagery recalls the darker films of David Cronenberg; Sitkin just seems to have found a different way of looking at the humanity. Check out the artist’s Instagram here.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Swedish fashion designer Bea Szenfeld is known for her experimental style that uses unconventional materials to create her extraordinary pieces. Her Haute Papier collection features handmade outfits constructed entirely from paper, showcasing her imaginative approach and technical ability to transform the material into wearable art. Now, Szenfeld takes her origami-inspired fashion from the runway to the theatre in a collaboration with the Royal Swedish Opera, featuring dancers modeling her designs. The images of ballerinas dressed in Szenfeld’s voluminous, sculptural costumes are currently on display at the Dansmuseet in Stockholm in an exhibition called “Everything You Can Imagine is Real”. Images by Karolina Henke.