by Andy SmithPosted on

Born in Tibet and raised in Dharamsala, India, Pema Rinzin uses centuries-old thangka techniques to create contemporary works. The result are fresh, gorgeous renderings in ground mineral pigments, Sumi ink, and gold. Rinzin’s personal charge is to bring an education on Tibetan art to the public and schools across the world.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Vanna Bowles is a visual artist who creates sculptures, drawings, and installations with people and nature as her central subjects. The artist is fond of combining her pencil work with mixed media to create a three-dimensional, illusory effect, with pieces extending from the surface of her canvas and into the viewer’s surrounding space. Bowles has exhibited her work at the Lars Bohman Gallery in Stockholm, Malmö Art Museum and the Stenersen Museum in Oslo.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Themes of science and introspection permeate throughout the oil paintings created by Romanian artist Victor Fota. His current body of work, “Human Extension,” progresses those ideas by exploring relationships between man and machine. The result is a surreal experience entangled in reality and science fiction.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Dubbing themselves “professional spraycationers,” Yok & Sheryo inject pops of cartoon joy into everyday life. Their Fruit and Vegetables La-la land in Singapore is an explosive example of what happens when the pair can run wild, tapping both their inner-children and actual youth from the area to make the creations. Their work can also be seen on public walls across the world, and on Instagram—documenting their adventures under the moniker “spacecandy.” They were last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Instinctual Feast is the latest series by Tanmaya Bingham, comprised of five mixed-media works that explore the many facets and faces of human connection. Specifically, the series represents ideas of ecstasy, pining, pleasure, compassion, and lust – all intrinsic parts of a deeply personal yet universally understood experience.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Ben Howe’s haunting images of broken, sliced and shredded faces may resemble digitally altered photographs, yet they are actually oil paintings rendered on canvas and board. Part of his ongoing series titled Surface Variations, the paintings are not only visually startling, but also deeply reflective on the nature of human consciousness — challenging our perception of the human form and exploring concepts of fractured memory and identity. The latest additions to the series are currently featured in Transmogrify, a group exhibition at the beinArt Gallery, until July 19.