by Andy SmithPosted on

Amy Sherald’s oil paintings are arresting portraits, absorbing in their choices of palette and mood. Within her works’ titles, we’re given further insight into the personalities of these figures, like “What’s Precious Inside Of Him Does Not Care To Be Known By The Mind In Ways That Diminish Its Presence (All American)” and “Try On Dreams Until I Find The One That Fits Me. They All Fit Me.” Yet, these works stand alone as engrossing, vibrant odes to individualism. For a recent show at Monique Meloche Gallery in Chicago, the venue said that the artist creates “imagined figures based on real-life interactions, subverting and exploring notions of black identity through her unique sense of visual culture, color and line.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Bernie Wrightson, a comic book industry vet and celebrated illustrator, died on March 18. The artist was vastly influential for generations of illustrators, cited for his elaborate line work and absorbing detail. Wrightson was legend in the horror genre, in particular, mixing both the beautiful and the unsettling in his pen and brush work. Shown are images from his revered Bernie Wrightson’s Frankenstein series, adapting the classic Mary Shelley novel.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Korea-born artist David Choong Lee made a notable shift from realism to abstraction in recent years, his new work containing lush, vibrant landscapes and otherworldly figures. An upcoming show at Jonathan Levine Gallery, titled “Gravity,” offers new works from the San Francisco art scene vet. The show kicks off April 1 and runs through April 29.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Raquel Rodrigo creates street art using the unlikely process of cross-stitching. The Spanish artist’s works occupy walls and structures in Madrid and Valencia. Whether towering over passers-by or adorning eye-level dividers, Rodrigo and her team craft flowery pieces in the same intricate, painstaking process. All appear as pixelated wonders when closely inspected.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Deborah Simon, a Virginia-born, New York-based artist, creates sculptures that explore “the reality of the animal and the vulnerability imbued in toy.” Though her sculptures appear to be taxidermy, series like “Flayed Animals” are made entirely from hand. She uses materials like polymer clay, faux fur, acrylic paint, wire, foam, glass, and embroidery materials to create these animals, mostly focusing on bears.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Since the 1980s, Calvin Nicholls has created paper sculptures that blend 2D and 3D processes, cutting and layering paper for works that escape from the canvas. The artist typically focuses his efforts on creatures from the animal kingdom, emulating the forms of nature only using one or two colors and a meticulous process. The artist says he enjoys white on white, in particular, “due to the emphasis which is placed on texture and form.”