by Margot BuermannPosted on


Rebecca Morgan’s portraits of country folk are delightfully weird if somewhat off-putting. Set in hunting camps and other woodsy environments, the artist’s work is an exploration of rural and off-the-grid culture, featuring an array of eccentric characters. Her paintings and drawings bounce between humorous, ambivalent and grotesque depictions of everyday existence in rural Appalachia, inspired by the artist’s upbringing in a small town in central Pennsylvania. Check out more of her work on Instagram.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Justin Lovato, a California native, is a self-taught artist who blends abstract shapes and patterns for scenes that traverse worlds. While his paintings tend toward wild, overlaid landscapes, his works on paper often feature interdimensional beings entangled in the artist’s backdrops. Lovato was last featured on HiFructose.com here, in a piece that focuses on his acrylic paintings on canvas.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Chilean painter and visual artist Bruna Truffa combines imagery gathered from art history, popular culture and everyday life to present critiques on modern society and the institution of art itself. Flavored with kitsch, her works have previously explored notions of national identity, propaganda, consumerism and the contemporary feminine experience. In her latest series of oil-on-canvas paintings, the artist addresses ideas behind “Wonderland”, described as a “fantasy wonderland and illusion, the dream of happiness, and the unfulfilled promise of the neoliberal realization.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Daniel van Nes, a Dutch artist, draws, paints, engraves, and creates installations and virtual reality experiences in a “machine noir” world. Projects like “SellFable City: Circuit Circus” are immersive experiences that invite visitors into physical and virtual representations of the artist’s charcoal renderings and other traditional work. The circus, hosted by Tetem in Enschede, Netherlands last spring, relates the various talents of Nes.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The personal work of Brooklyn-born sculptor Dave Cortes is forged from varying types of woods and precious metals. These pieces, whether a dramatic face distorted from brute force or a quieter, grotesque mediation, “represent an encapsulated moment of inspiration,” Cortes says. The artist has created commercial work for DC Comics, Sideshow Toys, Toy Biz, and MacFarlane Toys.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


French ceramicist Juliette Clovis creates beautifully strange sculptures of women that blend elements of myth, nature, and feminine form. Placing special emphasis on technique and aesthetics, the artist applies cut Limoges porcelain to simple female busts, transforming them into mesmerizing new species that draw from various wildlife and flora. Through the process of mutation, these hybrid creatures become vehicles for exploring feminine identity in relation to the natural world.