by Andy SmithPosted on

Installation artist Michael Murphy is wowing with his work currently showing at the Wonderspaces pop-up event in San Diego. “Come Together,” an installation made of 2,200 descended parts, appears as a closed fist at certain angles. Murphy uses the phrase “Perceptual Art” to describe his works, which often contain meticulously crafted installations that depend on perspective.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Texas-born artist Jason Limon moves into even stranger territory with his new acrylic paintings on panel. Several of the artist’s new works implement phrases like “Calling All Numbskulls,” pushing forward an idea that started with his “Three Letter Words” series from last year. Limon was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Tennessee native Richard W. James uses ceramics and found objects to create surreal figures and scenes. Using earthenware, fabrics, and underglaze, he forges these characters from materials he associated with his youth. The artist says that in doing this, he “explores the discrepancy between how we, as humans, see ourselves and how we would like others to see us.”

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Amy Spassov’s flora-filled mixed-media paintings draw parallels between the natural world and the human experience. Beginning by covering every inch of the canvas, the artist then starts “deducting with white paint” in the journey toward the finished product. Her latest series, “Pollination,” is reminiscent of her vibrant previous works, yet is packed with evolved themes and reflections.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Nestled beneath the Standard, High Line in New York City’s Meatpacking District, Lucy Sparrow’s all-felt bodega is the first store of its kind. Thousands of products have been created for the space, which duplicates the classic New York bodega with each item a product of the artist’s handiwork. This rendition is called “8 ‘Till Late,” following similar projects from the artist, and takes its host city as one of its biggest inspirations.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Sergio Martinez’s oil paintings teem with movement, athleticism, and drama. The artist, born in Chile in the the mid-1960s, works in “descriptive realism.” The result of his gravitation toward cabaret and circus life translates to work full of danger and grace. A biography offers insights on Sergio’s current path.