by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Jeremy Fish’s solo show “Yesterdays and Tomorrows” at San Francisco’s FFDG has a carefully planned installation. Black lines on the gallery’s left wall outline a cartoon thought bubble that houses almost 20 years worth of drawings; on the parallel wall of the narrow space, mural-scale paintings hang inside the hollow outlines of cartoon bunnies painted directly on the room’s surface. But at the opening night of “Yesterdays and Tomorrows,” it was difficult to even get close enough to see these meticulous details. A huge crowd had amassed to celebrate an informal retrospective of one of San Francisco’s most well-known artists from the past two decades.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Though the starting point of his work stems from complex ideas surrounding our perception of reality, Bruno Novelli makes these intellectual concepts an afterthought in his candy-colored abstract paintings. His work gives visual pleasure first and foremost. Novelli (who sometimes playfully stylizes his last name as 9li) recently presented a new series of paintings titled “Materia Radiante” at David B. Smith Gallery in Denver.

by CaroPosted on

On Saturday at Mark Moore gallery, Rob and Christian Clayton aka Clayton Brothers brought together an expansive body of eclectic work, “Open to the Public” (previewed here). The exhibition includes everything from miniature drawing, painting, sculptures, interactive video and an installation that is like a twisted child’s playroom. The brothers credit their thrift shop “mecca”, the Sun Thrift Store in Sunland, CA as the visual inspiration.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Since Kamea Hadar and Defer collaborated last February on a mural in Honolulu for Pow Wow Hawaii, the two artists have joined forces in the studio for a new series of paintings currently on view at 1AM Gallery in San Francisco. Hadar’s portraiture and Defer’s otherworldly calligraphy complement each other almost seamlessly, as demonstrated by their most recent joint effort, “Paradise Lost.”

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Vesod and Morten Andersen are two painters who refuse to let time stand still. While the former works with figures that seem to move like slowed-down frames in an animation (Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase comes to mind), the latter fractures abstract forms that seem to shape-shift before our eyes. Currently on view at LA’s C.A.V.E. Gallery, Vesod and Morten Andersen’s two-person show “Remix Every Second” is an exploration of the ways the two artists can distort viewers’ experiences and even perhaps make them reflect on their perceptions of reality. Take a look at some opening night photos from “Remix Every Second” and see the show before it closes on September 6.

by James ScarboroughPosted on

There, but not really. That’s the context for Barcelona-born artist Jaume Plensa’s public sculptures. They might seem like intrusions. They’re large. They’re set where people congregate. And the figures themselves are huge monumental heads. They sit in business districts and in front of an art museum. They emerge from the ocean. They hover above unsuspecting pedestrians. They rest in the neighborhood that surrounds the Venice Biennale.