by CaroPosted on

The work of Japanese artist Yasuaki Onishi has been compared to ethereal dreamscapes.  He creates complex shapes with simple materials like dyed hot glue, clear plastic, and thread that inspire the imagination.  Some see floating mountains, rain, and clouds, speaking to the broad scope of interpretation of his work.  While Onishi’s flowing linear installations are site specific, they also celebrate the ‘happy accident’.  Each piece begins with an organic object hung by fishing line, then connected to plastic sheets on which Onishi instinctively drizzles glue.  Once the glue is dry, a cast of the object is revealed.  Read more after the jump.

by CaroPosted on

Japanese mythology and folktales are the inspiration behind Stephanie Inagaki’s upcoming debut solo show at Century Guild on April 26th.  A southern California native, her work is a unique blend of personal history and strong sense of Japanese heritage. Inagaki’s intimate charcoal drawings of young women focus on themes of birth, growth, and emotional experience.  For “Metamorphosis”, anthropomorphic female figures such as winged sirens and mermaids are mixed with colorful, traditional Japanese motifs.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Often depicted as bored, restless youngsters, Hebru Brantley’s solitary heroes exist between two worlds: their mundane realities and their boisterous imaginations, which Brantley depicts as a cacophony of black-and-white characters and scribbled text. Sometimes the imaginary layer of the work is kept to a quiet whisper, and other times it takes over the entire canvas and we know we are in the land of make-believe. There is a sense of naïveté in Brantley’s characters that evokes the child-like beings of Yoshitomo Nara. Like Nara, Brantley’s work appears flat at a first glance, but is executed with painterly, thick brushstrokes that add a sense of depth and dimension. Having exhibited extensively throughout the US, the artist recently unveiled his UK debut, “Everyone’s Everything” at Mead Carney Fine Art in London. At their core, the paintings in the exhibition are a love letter to the imagination, and an invitation for the viewers to tap into a childlike sense of wonder in themselves.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

The dynamic of an artist duo is always an interesting one to observe. Of all the reasons two people choose to merge their artistic identities, Chinese art collective Tamen, composed of Lai Shengyu and Yang Xiaogang, chose a political one. In 2002, they became known by one name as a soft protest against the individualistic mindset that pervades today’s globalized society. As a result, their painting practice resembles that of conjoined twins: Each detail is executed as a seamless collaboration. Lai and Yang were born a year apart (1978 and 1979), completed the same post-graduate program in printmaking at Central Academy of Fine Arts in 2004 and both currently work in the Department of New Media Art in the Beihang University. Their nearly-parallel life paths converge with Tamen.

by Victoria Casal-DataPosted on

Israeli artist Roy Nachum creates oil paintings that feature fantastical settings and creatures alike. In his recent series, “Blind,” Nachum takes interest in juxtaposing images and words; the words are not legible to just anyone, however. Nachum chooses to lay out poems (written by the artist and inspired by the paintings) in Braille over the canvas, enabling the blind to appreciate his work just as a seeing spectator would. “My hope is that I can strike a variety of emotional chords with blind readers that is similar, but not identical, to what different people with sight take away from a painting,” he said in his artist statement.

by CaroPosted on

The work of Italian contemporary artist Livio Scarpella turns good and evil into delicacy.  This group of sculptures, named “Ghosts Underground”, depicts lost souls anguishing beneath the effect of a thin veil.  Scarpella’s interest in this subject was inspired by a trip to the Sansevero Chapel in Naples, home to Antonio Corradini’s “Veiled Christ”.  Before that time, he mostly exhibited paintings for a decade. By mixing influences of Rococo sculptors like Corradini with modern iconography, Scarpella explores a struggle with religious faith.