by Andy SmithPosted on

With “Shine,” painter Ken Flewellyn further explores the golden age of hip-hop and intersecting cultures. The show, currently running at Thinkspace Projects in Culver City, offers a set of new works, including a collaboration with artist Brian Viveros. Flewellyn was recently featured in print with Hi-Fructose Vol. 47.

by Andy SmithPosted on

With his distinct thin brushstrokes in acrylics and Indian ink, Glenn Brown’s swirling portraits offer both art-historical reverence and his own distinctive sensibility. Elsewhere, in his work in oils have a particularly unsettling quality, the textured faces of his subjects melting into different hues.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Photo: Ka-Man Tse for Times Square Arts

Kehinde Wiley recently offered his first public work with the unveiling of “Rumors of War,” a bronze sculpture first shown at Times Square in New York City. The piece was commissioned by the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts and will eventually be installed there. The work, with its contemporary African-American subject, stands in contrast to the Confederate statues that still populate the state that will serve as its permanent home. Wiley was our cover artist for Hi-Fructose Vol. 36.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Rendered just in black inks, Pony Reinhardt’s are riveting tethers to the natural world. The tattoo artist and owner of Portland’s Tenderfoot Studios describes herself as “an astral ruffian, thriving in the wilderness of the lost and found nebulae and dripping carbon monoxide” and her “art is a cosmic cataclysm of the Ghastly Phantastic.” That celestial quality does carry through to the recent works shown below.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Gregory Ferrand’s cinematic paintings, often laced with anachronisms, speak to a broader sense of isolation belonging to an otherwise social species. The artist’s academic background in film is evident throughout his works, with a full-frame attention to mood and detail. Among the artist’s other influences: Mexican muralists, comic books, and quite evident below, a mid-19th-century aesthetic.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Keiichi Tanaami’s wild sculptures and mixed-media works currently inhabit Jeffrey Deitch’s New York location, as an extension of its “Tokyo Pop Underground” group show. The Hi-Fructose Vol. 38 cover artist is featured at the space until Nov. 2. We last mentioned Tanaami on our site here, in a story on his collaboration with artist Oliver Payne.