by Andy SmithPosted on

David Krovblit’s pop surrealist collages explore consumerism, sexuality, and other social themes. His “Porthole” series, in particular, juxtaposes retro exploration gear, floral arrangements, and Western iconography. His work is part of the current collage group show “Mèlange” at Arch Enemy Arts, running until Aug. 25.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The “live sculptures” of Roman Ermakov combine fashion, fine art, and installation work, each offering an energy and vibrancy powered by the humans bearing his works. These creations from the Moscow-based artist enliven both the runaway and public spaces. His recent work, as shown, takes influence from the costume parties of Germany’s Bauhaus school in the 1920s, where these artists’ radical ideas in architecture and sculpture were also channeled.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Elizabeth Glaessner utilizes water-dispersed pigment and inks in her absorbing, vibrant scenes and portraits. The works, moving reality and dreamlike settings, explore humanity in their imperfect forms. Often, her work is pulling from both mythology and her own experiences in her paintings.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Lauren Marx

In a new group show at Beinart Gallery in Australia, nature’s flora and fauna are explored. Courtney Brims, Lauren Marx, Crystal Morey and Thomas Jackson, each with his or her own distinctive approach and themes, contribute to “Botanical Bestiary,” which runs from Aug. 11 through Sept. 2 at the space. Much of the work is inspired by the terrain of Australia itself, from the native artists.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Using the Mongol zurag style of painting, Baatarzorig Batjargal brings a contemporary and globe-spanning mentality into the century-old approach. A native of Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, the artist’s distinctive observance of tradition puts a fascinating spotlight on how his home has changed.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Sasha Gordon‘s vivid oil paintings feature touches of the surreal, exploring themes such as mental illness and sexuality. The artist, currently a student at the Rhode Island School of Design, has moved from intimate, realistic portraits to more conceptual, perspective shifting work recently. Works such as “I Left The Night The Dummy Crashed The Gordon’s Volvo” offer seemingly personal narratives with several elements to unpack.