by Victoria Casal-DataPosted on

English artist Chris Wood creates glass wall-panels that showcase maze-like structures that give the illusion of depth and brilliance through the glass’ interaction with natural and artificial light sources. The artist’s usage of small, reflective, dichroic (meaning “two color”) pieces of glass lets her easily create complex patterns of light and shade; the colors and textures that derive from these structures change in accordance to the position of the viewer and the angle of the light source, making her work an ever-changing, almost magical and intriguing phenomenon.

by Victoria Casal-DataPosted on

Toronto-based artist Christine Kim creates intricate collage pieces that explore the idea of boundaries — both in her choice of materials and narratives. She looks to investigate the idea of displacement and how it borderlines transient and permanent conditions. She specializes in illustration, installations and sculpture.

by Victoria Casal-DataPosted on

From sculpture to photography and video art, every aspect of Italian artist Christian Zucconi’s work is devoted to the study of human flesh and its many evolutions. His sculpture is particularly strong in its portrayal of decay and deconstruction, as much of his recent work, such as his latest Corpo and Leviathan, displays the human figure in a state of tangible decomposition and subtle regeneration expressed through stitched-up parts, rugged textures and missing body parts.

by Victoria Casal-DataPosted on

Korean artist Yong Ho Ji creates animal/human hybrids made out of recycled tires. Ji calls his variations “mutants” in order to refer to both their hybrid forms and their recycled medium. “My concept is mutation,” Ji says, “the end product is technically from nature; it is made from the white sap of latex trees but here it has changed. The color is black and the look is scary.”

by Victoria Casal-DataPosted on

Swiss artists Pablo Togni and Christian Rebecchi join forces for a variety of interdisciplinary art projects as NEVERCREW. The duo is known for their large scaled murals and public art initiatives that share common grounds with not only graffiti, but illustration and graphic design as well. Their integrative style explores the relationship between public space, the artwork and the viewer — the strong interaction among the elements creates a balanced whole.

by Victoria Casal-DataPosted on

Traditionally, the self-portrait gives the viewer an outward representation of the inner self. Painter Haley Hasler, however, is interested in creating self-portraits that confront the viewer with the exterior self — the different roles and expectations other expect us to fill. With a colorful palette, Hasler looks at herself through the many fantasies, realities, fears and motivations that live within her. Using a realist painting technique, the artist is able to freely cross the border between the imagined and the real.