by CaroPosted on

We’ve been steadily following the expansion of Thinkspace Gallery in Los Angeles into overseas territory with their ongoing ‘LAX’ exhibition series. Their latest collaboration is with StolenSpace Gallery in London, which debuted last night, and it is perhaps their most massive at 136 artists and over 140 works of art. In the tradition of the series, “LAX/LHR” showcases an eclectic mixture from painting, mixed media, and sculptural pieces by both local and international artists alike. There is an especially heavy volume of contributors from the urban art persuasion, considering the gallery’s ties with British street artist D*Dace.

by Roxanne GoldbergPosted on

In Tabaimo‘s worlds, nothing is as ordinary as it appears. Light bulbs morph into moons, walls dissolve, and trees turn into snakes. These eldritch environments capture the viewer who stands at the center, and transports him into an unknown underbelly of the everyday. The artist achieves a totaling effect by manipulating architectural elements and allowing hand-drawn animations that reference both Japanese manga and traditional Edo-period prints, to organically bleed out of the two-dimensional plane and into the exhibition space. The result is a pseudo-theater where the viewer is the main actor among anthropomorphic objects and a cast of characters, whose interplay raises social, political, and gendered topics of contemporary import.

by CaroPosted on

Swedish artist Mikael Takacs creates mesmerizing paintings that he then distorts with marble effects. His subjects are people that he has met in his own life, warped into his own interpretations using the abstract expression of marbling. “I find that the half abstract nature of my portraits makes it both easier and harder to connect with them. It’s harder in the sense that you can’t really see who it is, or maybe even what it is. It may be easier to connect with them for basically the same reason, as you can project so much of your own thoughts onto someone you can just barely see.”

by CaroPosted on

For centuries, the wonders of the natural world have inspired artists to create fantasy, and since the Middle Ages, have applied legendary characteristics to animals. For the fourth year in a row, Antler Gallery in Portland has invited artists to join in this tradition of creating their own mythical creatures inspired by nature. “Unnatural Histories 4″ will highlight whimsical new works by Lisa Ericson, Jeff P., Jon Mcnair, Erika Sanada, Josh Keyes, Peter Gronquist, Josie Morway, Brin Levinson, Jessica Joslin, Matt Linares, Aunia Kahn, Nicomi Nix Turner, and more.

by CaroPosted on

Seattle based artist Claire Johnson and Canadian artist Brad Woodfin each portray their own take on natural beauty with realistic detail. While Johnson overpowers her canvases with largescale aerial landscapes, Woodfin’s animal subjects are mysteriously bereft of their environment. Opening tonight, the two artists will debut their new works together at Roq la Rue Gallery in Seattle.

by CaroPosted on

Kari-Lise Alexander is fascinated by the landscape and mythology of her Scandinavian roots. We recently featured her ethereal oil and acrylic paintings on our blog, mostly portraits of girls that resemble the nymphs of Nordic folklore. Living and working in Seattle, with its cool and wet winters, also provides Alexander with inspiration, and we often find her subjects bathing in or near water. She portrays mythical swan-maidens in her upcoming solo exhibition at Modern Eden Gallery in San Francisco, “A Lovelorn Theft”.