by Andy SmithPosted on

Telmo Miel is a duo consisting of Dutch artists Telmo Pieper and Miel Krutzmann, and the two are known for their murals, appearing across the world. Though the pair also regularly produces interior and canvas works, also carrying their sense of layering and surrealism. Telmo Miel’s work last appear on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Korean ceramics artist Maeng Wookjae creates strange animals and figures that feel both familiar, yet disconcertingly outside the realm of reality. Yet, the artist’s work may be more tethered to our own world than one would imagine. In a statement, he details his thought process in engaging with the viewer, saying one “not only intellectually comprehends the work but also viscerally appreciates it if their preconceptions are challenged or senses other than sight are stimulated.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Matthew Stone creates surreal, figurativeworks that are a combination of digital printing and acrylic on linen. The London-based artist, part of the art collective !WOWOW!, has worked in painting, photography, sculpting, performance art, writing, and other endeavors. “Healing With Wounds,” a newer body of work, is said to be “showing diverse bodies at play and in conflict.” He was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

C7 is the moniker of Hiroko Shiina, a Japanese artist who creates surreal and bleak illustrations with multiple tools. She’s used acrylics, ink, colored pencil, and even coffee to craft her moody works. Her works appears to be informed by dreams, the natural world, and isolated emotions.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Molly Gruninger’s work may appear to be digitally created, but these pieces are actually oil on canvas. The Los Angeles-based artist uses her multi-disciplinary talents to craft figures that are both ornate and elegantly simple in how they’re framed in each work.

by Andy SmithPosted on

AJ Fosik, a self-described “sawdust provocateur,” crafts wooden sculptures that appear as totem-like beasts, extending from the wall with a spiritual vibrancy. The artist counts taxidermy, rituals from varying cultures, and folk art as influences in these pieces. The nature of how the pieces stand or are mounted to walls, in particular, references taxidermic practices. His work adorned the cover of Hi-Fructose Vol. 18.