by CaroPosted on

Many of us brought our toys to the kitchen table and played with our food, much to our parents’ dismay. Although toys were designed to entertain and inspire us in our youth, many artists continue to look back at these childhood artifacts for inspiration. Miami based sculptor and photographer Pablo Dona often refers to his memories of playtime in his art. His installations of hand-crafted miniature people interacting with commonplace items take the innocence of play and create a surreal new reality.

by CaroPosted on

The word “mythological” is often used to describe the work of Mexican artist Curiot (real name Favio Martinez). Featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 29, Curiot doesn’t apply a specific myth to the images that he paints, strongly inspired by his Mexican heritage which he hopes to uphold in his art. “The mythological creatures represent the forces of nature, the energy that flows in the universe and their relationship with the world- I like to believe they come from the spirit realm,” he told us.

by Sasha BogojevPosted on

Michael Reid Gallery in Sydney is currently showing “Maelstrom”, an exhibition of photographs by professional photographer and creative director, Luke Shadbolt. As a part of the Head On Photo Festival of Sydney, this showcase includes Shadbolt’s explosive photographs capturing raw oceanic force.

by CaroPosted on

David Rice fuses the natural and the man-made in his paintings, representing the possibility of a peaceful balance between the two. Featured here on our blog, and in our current issue of Hi-Fructose Vol. 39, his wildlife-filled works address themes like cohabitation, where people and animals are combined to create hybrid beings, often wrapped in colorful textiles. The Portland based painter is about to debut a new series, entitled “High Alpine”, his largest body of work to date.

by CaroPosted on

Scott G. Brooks, featured here on our blog, paints offbeat portraits, often expressing a surreal narrative inspired by children’s books and his own psyche. Described as twisted, sentimental, and disturbing, his portraits are characterized by his use of wit and the distorted version of reality they present. “Using a language that is easily understood, I tell stories. I weave figures, symbols, and elements together to create a narrative to share with an audience,” he says.

by CaroPosted on

Yayoi Kusama’s art is in London this month as part of a new exhibition at the Victoria Miro gallery. Her internationally known work is obsessive and overwhelming, presenting the world as a polka-dotted dream land, featured in Hi-Fructose Vol 25. The word “extraordinary” is overused in writing about contemporary art but we can make an exception for Kusama, who has been selected as one of TIME Magazine’s World’s 100 Most Influential People for conquering both the art and fashion world. “Dots are a symbol of the world, the cosmos; the earth is a dot. The sun, the moon, the stars are all made up of dots. You and me, we are dots,” she once said.