by Andy SmithPosted on


Visoth Kakvei, a Cambodia-born artist who resides in Maine, crafts intricate, illusion-filled drawings inside of his sketchbook.The artist sometimes digitally enhances these works, further pushing the absorbing nature of his work and keeping the viewer guessing which aspects of the work are inherent and which are affected.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Argentina-born, Barcelona-based painter Peca crafts paintings, drawings, and stop-motion films in which fictional creatures roam and cosmic, surreal scenes unfold. In this exclusive peek inside her sketchbook, this imagery is mixed with typographic elements. And although Peca’s work may seem otherworldly, there’s an introspective, autobiographical quality to these images.

by CaroPosted on

San Jose based comic book artist and “professional hater” Jonathan Wayshak draws energetic illustrations which were featured in Hi-Fructose Collected II. At his Facebook page, he writes “I draw pictures with a lot of lines and huge nipples”, but that’s a modest description of his rough and enthralling drawing style. Wayshak works with a variety of materials; brush ink, gouache, acrylic, pencil, watercolors, pens, on whatever else is handy – paper scraps and leftover cut down illustration boards or watercolor paper. Take a look inside Wayshak’s sketchbook after the jump.

by CaroPosted on

If Daniel Merriam’s watercolors were books, they would be fairytales once upon a time in a far away European dreamland. The painter, who is currently exhibiting at AFA Gallery (covered here), compares his process to a writer’s. In our recent interview, Merriam told us about the influence of 17th and 18th century Baroque architecture on his works which he draws from memory.  Although imaginary, his elaborate structures must be believable in their world, and he builds them out carefully as a point of reference. In this sense, one could also call him an architect.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Los Angeles-based artist Andrew Hem (featured on the cover of HF Vol. 21) paints scenes filled with kaleidoscopic colors that convey a sense of fluid motion. His work feels like snapshots of his youthful characters’ adventures. While he paints murals and dabbles in commercial illustration, Hem’s primary focus has been on his personal studio practice in recent years. We featured his last solo show, “Dream But Don’t Sleep” at Merry Karnowsky Gallery, here on the blog earlier this year. Today, we take a look Hem’s process with a peek inside his sketchbook and an exclusive interview.

by Hi-Fructose StaffPosted on

Our latest issue, Hi-Fructose Volume 29, hit newsstands and bookstores at the beginning of October and this issue features a special sketchbook insert by Femke Hiemstra. Known for her surreal paintings of anthropomorphized animals, Hiemstra is a deft draftsperson whose high-contrast monochromatic artworks contain a similar mysticism to her color-saturated oil paintings. Illuminated as if by candlelight, the graphite drawings in the sketchbook insert inside the issue are printed on heavyweight sketchbook paper and offer an intimate look at Hiemstra’s creative process. Take a look at some of the works in the sketchbook insert and pick up your copy of Hi-Fructose Vol. 29 to see the rest of the work. See more after the jump.