by Andy SmithPosted on

Ron Mueck gathers 100 individual, enormous skulls for a new installation at National Gallery of Victoria’s Triennial. The sculptures in “Mass” are crafted from fiberglass and resin, and each is about a meter high. Mueck’s hyperrealist work was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by CaroPosted on

The Winnipeg Art Gallery (WAG) in Canada is currently exhibiting some of hyperrealist sculptor Ron Mueck’s most poignant works to date. The Australia born artist, recently featured in HF Vol. 30, is well known for his larger-than-life fiberglass portrait sculptures of life’s key stages. This new exhibition, named “[email protected]: Ron Mueck” for its cooperation with the National Gallery of Canada, offers attendees a rare look at the process behind Mueck’s work, including his original maquettes and studies.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

At a first glance, Ron Mueck’s work space looks more like a laboratory than an artist’s studio. The hyper-realist sculptor has perfected the art of replicating human flesh, building human faces and bodies both in large and small scale, all the while staying true to anatomical proportions. Mueck is opening a solo show on April 16 at Fondation Cartier in Paris — his first major European solo show since 2005. Take a look at some images of Mueck in his London studio from photographer Gautier Deblonde‘s recent visit with the artist, as well as some of the pieces in the show. Ron Mueck’s work will be on view at Fondation Cartier April 16 – September 29.

by Hi-Fructose StaffPosted on

Part I London-based, Australian-born, hyper-realist sculptor Ron Mueck is shown here in action creating his awe-inspiring works. Part II

by Andy SmithPosted on

Using silicone, wood, resin, actual hair, and marble, Mexican sculptor Ruben Orozco crafts realistic depictions of famous figures. Created in varying scales, these entrancing figures have gone viral for their eerie reflection of humanity. He’s created sculptures depicting Frida Kahlo, Pope Francis, and other historical figures. The work may remind you of other sculptors of realistic figures, like Ron Mueck and Kazuhiro Tsuji.

by CaroPosted on

Throughout his forty-year career, the late artist Duane Hanson made lifelike sculptures that portrayed working class Americans. For the first time since his UK retrospective in 1997, Serpentine Galleries in London is showcasing a new selection of some of the sculptor’s key pieces. Hanson is credited as a major contributor to the hyperrealism movement. His art went on to inspire contemporary artists like Ron Mueck (covered here) and can be found in major museums and collections, such as the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C. and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York.