by CaroPosted on

Richard Colman is well known for his paintings of colorful human figures bending and twisting into abstract compositions. Featured here on our blog, Colman’s new works explore the intricacies and curiosities of human relationships in bold and geometric displays. Similar to the frontalism style seen in Egyptian art, the heads of his figures are usually drawn in profile, while the body is seen from the front. The San Francisco based artist recently exhibited in the rotating Los Angeles exhibition curated by Roger Gastman, “W.I.P.” (Work in Progress), which closed over the holiday.

by Roxanne GoldbergPosted on

Acrobatic bodies, dismembered heads and elongated limbs stack, twist, and slide among one another to create complex human compositions. The new paintings by Richard Colman are now on display in his solo exhibition, “Faces, Figures, Places, and Things,” as the inaugural exhibition for San Francisco’s Chandran Gallery. The colorful artworks apply both subtle and obvious, real and fantastical instances of human behavior to explore the intricacies and curiosities of human relations. Coleman’s use of minimalist forms and color blocking guide one to focus on the content of his paintings as opposed to their surface aesthetics.

by JL SchnabelPosted on


Currently showing at Toronto’s Copper Cole Gallery is a two person exhibition ‘Destroyer’ featuring new works from artists Andrew Schoultz and Richard Colman . This pairing illuminates the similarities between the two artists’ graphic line works and bold colors, as well as their preoccupations with social elements and woodland landscapes. Featuring dark horses, grim reapers and a psychedelic color palette the exhibition explores a convergence of death, sexuality and the beauty of nature heralded under the dark exhibition title. View more of the new works after the jump, here on Hi-Fructose

by Ken HarmanPosted on

Earlier this week, Hi-Fructose paid a visit to one of our favorite San Francisco based painters, Richard Colman, whom ongtime readers will remember from his show at Guerrero Gallery last year (seen here.) As we hadn’t visited the artist’s space in a couple years, we decided to take a jaunt down to his new studio to check out the large scale indoor mural the artist is currently working on. The Gagosian Gallery in Beverly Hills, unbeknownst to us, have apparently been running a curated program of rotating work for their rest rooms, the majority of which is design based and digitally printed for application.

For his commission, Colman has decided to provide something a bit different as his floor to ceiling work will soon become an immersive and likely overwhelming installation. All painstakingly hand painted, the piece has been in production for quite some time, with much more work to be done as the artist is also planning on painting the floors and incorporating mirrored elements. Join us after the jump for a look inside Colman’s new studio and work, here on Hi-Fructose. – Ken Harman

by JL SchnabelPosted on

Taking a closer look into the Volta show in NYC, we weremesmerized by V1 gallery’s presentation of artist Richard Colman’s new body ofwork, ‘Can’t Get There From Here.’ The complex ritualizedscenes create a dramatic and dizzying effect while the patterns of a range ofbright colors on top of one another in perfectly geometric shapes is mimickedby the towers of fleshy nude characters. Take a peek at more of the work after the jump.

by Ken HarmanPosted on

Following his recent showing down in Los Angeles’ New Image Art (see our studio visit here), Richard Colman‘s orgies of psychedelia continue to spread with a virus-like quickness as the esteemed painter returns home to San Francisco for a new show at Guerrero Gallery. Entitled “Something Better”, Colman’s highly sought after works transcend even their own reputation as the artist has constructed a massive temple-like installation in the museum quality space. Notably, Ryan Travis Christian‘s graphite and ink works in the project room provides for a fluid exhibition that’s highly recommended.