by Andy SmithPosted on

In conjunction with “Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose” at Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art, painter Martin Wittfooth visits for a talk and Q&A on Thursday, Nov. 10. The narratives of the artist’s paintings focus on animals, offering allegorical and dystopian tales of a post-human world. The artist created the cover for Hi-Fructose Volume 35. The talk, kicking off at 6:30 p.m., is free for museum members and $5 for non-members. Get more info here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


New York artist Martin Wittfooth continues to explore the relationship between the contemporary experience and nature with a new show at Corey Helford Gallery titled “The Archaic Revival,” which runs through Oct. 29 at the space. The title of the show comes from ethnobotanist and philosopher Terence McKenna, who held a theory that society was reverting back to archaic values and norms in order to heal itself from a modern, poisonous condition. The artist, a Toronto native, is currently based in Brooklyn.

by CaroPosted on

Stephen Romano Gallery in Brooklyn has assembled a rather eerie exhibition in cooperation with Morbid Anatomy Museum that pairs contemporary works with a wide variety of vernacular photography, folk sculpture, spirit photography, and more. “OPUS HYPNAGOGIA: Sacred Spaces of the Visionary and Vernacular” takes a look at creative enlightenment over the centuries, and explores our ongoing fascination with mental phenomena like Hypnagogia. On display will be recent works by the likes of Martin Wittfooth (HF Vol. 19 cover artist), Kris Kuksi (first covered in HF Vol. 19), Caitlin McCormack, El Gato Chimney, Rithika Merchant, and Hunter Stabler whose creations share a surreal quality or supernatural theme.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

For their second collaborative project, the exhibition “De Anima” opening at Seattle’s Roq La Rue on May 1, Jean Labourdette (aka Turf One) and Martin Wittfooth present a new body of work focused on humans’ relationship with the natural world in the context of globalization. Though the two artists’ light, dreamy paintings of animals hint at a spiritual view of the nature, the show’s message is ultimately grounded in the unfortunate reality of the planet’s current state.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Martin Wittfooth (Hi-Fructose Vol. 19 cover artist) recently opened his show “Empire” at Corey Helford Gallery, presenting a collection of majestic, allegorical works on canvas. Interested in the idea of a repetitive cycle of history, Wittfooth chose to examine the way the notion of empire applies to modern day. The result is a series of subtle works that communicate these ideas slowly and patiently through rich imagery and pristine details. Take a look at some images from the opening night by Sam Graham courtesy of Corey Helford Gallery.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Casting solitary animals as the protagonists of his work, Martin Wittfooth (Hi-Fructose Vol. 19 cover artist) paints his own mythology. He prefers to use allegory to speak about contemporary issues humans face instead of apprehending his political ideas in a confrontational manner. In the case of his latest body of work for his upcoming solo show at Corey Helford Gallery, “Empire,” Wittfooth took an interest in exploring the way the idea of “empire” dominates the current world order. Read more after the jump.