by CaroPosted on

Two weeks ago, Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose opened to a colorful audience at the Virginia MOCA. Reviewed here on our blog and in our upcoming issue Volume 40 (now available for pre-order!), this landmark retrospective highlights the visionaries that have appeared in the magazine for the past forty issues, three books, and thousands of pages. Today, we bring you a video recap, courtesy of our friends Kyle Maier and Amie Gibson at Kamio Media.

by Hi-Fructose StaffPosted on

Los Angeles-based artist Rob Sato (first featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 16) creates detailed, fantastical paintings, whether of gigantic robots or battles on horseback, entirely using watercolor. Sato uses his preferred medium with precision, producing miniature figures and tiny details within his large compositions. His colors are not so much blended, but rather geometrically arranged in a series of coalescing, prismatic shapes that define his characteristic aesthetic. For our latest episode of “From Page to Screen,” Hi-Fructose visited Rob Sato’s studio in LA where he went through his work process, from sketchbook to final product. Watch the exclusive video after the jump.

by Hi-Fructose StaffPosted on

In our latest “From Page to Screen” video, where we take a closer look at the studios and processes of artists previously featured in the print issues of Hi-Fructose, we go inside the Oakland studio of Scott Hove (Hi-Fructose Collected 3). Better known as Cakeland, Hove’s studio is a surreal space where Hove works among the site-specific installations that make his studio a veritable pastel-hued dream world with a sinister twist. In the video, Hove discusses the morbid aspects of his sculptural work, like the guns, fangs and bones that appear among the cherries and frosting, and his views on the cyclical nature of life. Watch the video and check out some photos from Cakeland after the jump.

by Hi-Fructose StaffPosted on

Italian-born, LA-based artist Nicola Verlato (last featured in Hi-Fructose Collected 3) looks to the Renaissance for inspiration when staging his vividly-realistic paintings of collisions and catastrophes. The artist believes that figurative painting is vital to the mythology of a culture. In his case, the figures are rendered through a multiple-step process that begins with a photograph, which becomes a sculpture and then a computerized 3D model before it is sketched out and painted with oils. For our latest episode of “From Page to Screen,” we visited Varlato’s studio, where he took us step-by-step through his creative process. Watch other “From Page to Screen” videos on our YouTube Channel and check out the video after the jump.

by Hi-Fructose StaffPosted on

In the latest installment of our ongoing artist video series, “From Page to Screen” (see more installments on our YouTube channel), we visited Luke Chueh’s LA studio to catch up with the artist. Chueh’s use of the same few characters in his work, namely the bear, is what attracts his most loyal fans and biggest critics. In the video, Chueh addresses these issues and discusses how the bear was created and why it remains important in his work. Watch the video after the jump!

by Hi-Fructose StaffPosted on

Our latest “From Page to Screen Episode” is now live! Discover Mike Shine’s unique process and his Shine Shack studio with our Hi-Fructose exclusive video. Mike Shine lives and paints in Bolinas, California. He typically uses driftwood and found objects to create works that invite (or even require) the observer to handle and operate them, something he considers contrary to the sterile “please don’t touch” mentality of many art institutions. In the last year, Shine has been featured in The Museum of Craft and Folk Art’s Indoor/Outdoor exhibit and SFMOMA’s temporary outdoor installation, as well as San Francisco’s White Walls Gallery. Mike Shine has been featured in the pages of Hi-Fructose. Get a copy of Hi-Fructose Collected Vol. 3 here and watch the video after the jump.