by CaroPosted on

Chinese artist Gao Rong uses the handicraft she was taught as a child to create unbelievably realistic replicas of her gradparents’ home and parts of their surrounding neighborhood in inner Mongolia. Rong doesn’t consider herself an embroiderer, but rather a sculptor who uses embroidery. She likens her installations to sculpture, made from materials like cloth, cotton and sponge supported by metal frames to recreate things that would otherwise go unnoticed- thousands of tiny stitches are layered onto the fabric to create the effect of rust on pipes and peeling wallpaper.

by CaroPosted on

Burbank, California based artist Michelle Kingdom creates fantastically strange embroideries on linen that look like paintings. Some have even dubbed them as “stitched paintings.” For Kingdom, they are “narrative embroideries” that weave stories made out of thread. Embroidery is oftentimes discarded as craft, but that is part of its appeal to the artist, who uses it in an unexpected way to express her innermost thoughts and escape to her imaginary world.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

One could describe Mana Morimoto’s embroidered photographs as an unconventional form of collage. The Tokyo-based artist, who was educated in the US but returned to Japan just a few years ago, finds vintage photos and re-imagines them with her technicolor thread. While many of her subjects have lasers coming out of their eyes, Morimoto’s way of working is intentionally low tech. Each piece contains evidence of the hand-done process. Lately, Morimoto has been making abstract woven patterns with a psychedelic symmetry, departing from her usual figurative subjects. Take a look at some of her recent work after the jump.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Ana Teresa Barboza creates poignant vignettes using an unlikely combination of thread, photo transfer and graphite on canvas. Focusing on isolated, nude subjects, Barboza uses the embroidery aspect of her work to describe the characters’ inner pain. They pull on the threads, exposing their internal organs with contemplative gazes. The embroidered entrails create rich patterns that complement the baroque flourishes Barboza uses for her backgrounds. Take a look at some of her work after the jump.

by JL SchnabelPosted on

Artist Richard Saja manipulates pre-existing historicalscenes printed on fabric known as toile, by threading colorful floss over andaround the people and creatures inhabiting them. As a blend of humor anddelightfully odd imaginings, the work carries the weight of the past within itsfoundations while new skins of magic, freak shows, circus clowns and oddcouplings brighten the compositions and infuse it with a sincere beauty. Viewmore of the intriguing works after the jump.

by Andy SmithPosted on

For the upcoming Hi-Fructose Vol. 45, we’re offering an exclusive patch by Ziero for all current subscribers and the next 500 to sign up. The Mexican artist specializes in vibrant patches, toys, prints, jackets, and other products with his “unique characters and twisted scenarios.” Head to our store to subscribe to the magazine.