by Andy SmithPosted on


David Jien’s works on paper and sculptures blend modern pop culture and video games with historical iconography and imagery. These hyperdetailed works can feel both mythological and like a Nintendo RPG. The Los Angeles-based artist uses colored pencil and graphite on his paper works, along with occasional use of holographic film and other elements that add to their otherworldly nature.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Andrew Chuani Ho, a Los Angeles native, creates vibrant scenes with colored pencil on paper, with works that are both surreal and autobiographical. In his first solo show at Richard Heller Gallery, titled Days and Day, the artist brings his trademark insanity and blending components in a new set of works. The artist cites influences like Matisse, Marquez, and even Henry Darger. From the gallery: “Having a deeply spiritual upbringing, Ho’s work exhibits the use of patterns, colors and symbols to reinterpret myths and fables of yore into meditatively drawn colored pencil drawings.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Paul White focuses on a single medium in creating his hyper-detailed works: colored pencil on paper. In particular, the artist is focused on the concepts of decay and objects becoming obsolete. In terms of source material, much of his work is derived from photographs taken of desertscapes and other scenes across the West Coast.

by CaroPosted on

Eric Green’s meticulously detailed drawings replicate life beautifully- but there is something off about them. “When you really begin to understand life, everything changes completely all the time. Nothing is ever the same again,” he says. Working primarily in colored pencil, Green draws images that are meant to change our perceptions by illustrating the subtleties between moments as light changes and objects are mysteriously moved by unseen occupants.

by CaroPosted on

Infused with ecstasy and a dark beauty, Marco Mazzoni’s art underlines the connection between the natural world and our own. First featured on the cover of Hi-Fructose Vol. 20, and our blog, the Milan, Italy based artist uses nature as symbolism for his own observations about life, where ghostly figures often emerge in the final stage of drawing. Their eyes are never shown, as Mazzoni sees his work more like a composition of still life of small animals, flowers and leaves, rather than a portrait, rendered only using colored pencil.

by CaroPosted on

People complain a lot about Los Angeles: It’s too big, too spread out, and the traffic is terrible. But local artist Susan Logoreci sees a different side of her city that she conveys in her large-scale mosaic-like colored pencil drawings. Her images of the urban sprawl are drawn by hand and without a ruler or projector, giving her work a hand-made or in her words, “elastic”, quality that breaks the first rule of drawing architecture.