by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Chris Jones’s large-scale sculptural work looks fragile even though his subject matter often focuses on objects we presume to be tough, stable — even nearly unbreakable. In his current show at Mark Straus Gallery in New York City, a sports car melts and unravels before our eyes. A motorcycle tempts us to scratch and peel away its layers. Houses disintegrate into heaps of deteriorating objects. Jones works with abandoned and disused materials — old magazines, books, encyclopedias, paper ephemera and even trash — to create papier mache pieces that destabilize our view of the world around us. We create our environments through the accumulation of objects and materials. Jones’s latest body of work pulls us back, reminding us how ephemeral and artificial these things are. It’s a bleak reminder that material objects and the world we’ve built will not stand the test of time.

by CaroPosted on

Yesterday, we brought you our highlights of UNTITLED art fair, SCOPE Miami Beach, Miami Project and Art on Paper. Today, we continue our coverage with one of the most popular fairs during the jam-packed Miami Art Week- PULSE Miami Beach. Despite the dreary Miami weather, PULSE was in high attendance and notable for its engaging and interactive installations in collaboration with Target that attracted art lovers of every age. Designed as a platform for new video and media art, “Target Too” combined items sold at Target with art- though some blasted it as a commercial “sell-out”, we couldn’t help but smile at some of the works on display like Daniel Rozin’s Insta-worthy “Troll Mirror”, a mirror made of hundreds of pink and green treasure trolls that reflected your silhouette as you moved around the piece. Take a look at more of our highlights from PULSE Miami Beach after the jump!

by CaroPosted on

A new exhibit opening today at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art aims to take a snap shot of the ever growing New Contemporary “school”. It’s class? Many will be familiar to Hi-Fructose readers: Andrew Hem (HF Vol. 21 cover artist), Curiot (Hf Vol. 29), Ekundayo (HF Vol. 9), Erik Jones (HF Vol. 27 cover artist), Kwon Kyungyup (HF Vol. 24), Natalia Fabia (HF Vol. 22), Scott Radke (Hf Vol. 6), Yoskay Yamamoto (HF Vol. 8), and Yosuke Ueno (HF Vol. 10), to name a few. The exhibition will also include an abstract installation by artist Brett Amory (HF Vol. 20). “Invisible College”, which is co-curated by the museum’s Josef Zimmerman and Thinkspace Gallery in Los Angeles, presents New Contemporary as a movement that is both traditionally inspired and non traditional. See more after the jump.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Currently on view at Sirona Fine Art in Hallandale Beach, Florida, “Artist’s Gaze: Seeing Women in the 21st Century” is a large group show featuring work focused on female subjects. With a wide variety of male and female artists in the show, “Artist’s Gaze” presents a survey of portraits — some intimate, some sensual, and some exuding female power and strength. Artists like Daliah Lina Ammer, Susannah Martin, Dorielle Caimi, Park Hyung Jin, and Delita Pinchback Martin (and many, many others) presented diverse depictions of womanhood that stray from typical, sexualized media portrayals of the female body. The show was curated by artist Victoria Sellbach, whose work is also featured, and is on view through March 15.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

A city with more headlines about the tech industry than the art scene, San Francisco once had three spring time art fairs: Art Market (formerly, artMRKT), Art Pad and SF Fine Art Fair. Last year it narrowed down two. This year, there was only one art fair left standing: Art Market San Francisco, which ran May 15 through May 18. The closure of the other two fairs did not seem to be a bad omen for Art Market, however, which featured a diverse assortment of national galleries that offered many different flavors of contemporary, from Pop-inspired to dark to abstract. San Francisco art fairs tend to be home-grown productions, with Bay Area galleries dominating the landscape, but this year’s Art Market welcomed many exhibitors from other cities.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

The largest art fair on the West Coast, the 19th-annual LA Art Show wrapped up yesterday. Last week, we gave you a preview of “Littletopia,” the New Contemporary-centric part of the fair that featured many galleries that have appeared on the blog, such as Roq La Rue, Thinkspace, Spoke Art, La Luz de Jesus, Varnish Fine Art and more. At LAAS, we were excited to make new art discoveries as well as see new work from artists that have previously appeared in the print issues of Hi-Fructose. Read more after the jump!