by CaroPosted on

Puerto Rican street artist Alexis Diaz (covered here) recently teamed up with Chilean artist INTI to create a new mural for O.Bra Festival in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Their mural, which took over 1 week to complete, blends the two artist’s distinct imagery: Diaz’s detailed and crosshatched line work with colorful under layers, and INTI’s subjects inspired by life, death and religion, particularly Christianity. It features a surreal split-image of a skeletal robed woman, crowned with flowers and holding up a mechanical-like heart.

by Roxanne GoldbergPosted on

Since 2009, Urban Forms Gallery has been transforming the landscape of Polish city Lodz with a pulsing wave of colorful, graphic images. Puerto Rican muralist Alexis Diaz (previously covered by HF) is the latest in a string of internationally-known street artists including Brazil’s Os Gemeos, Belgium’s ROA, and Australia’s SHIDA, to have been invited to touch his brush to Poland’s walls. Diaz’s mural, entitled “Sentir,” is part of world-wide series, “HOY.” Translated to “Today,” Diaz’s current series is a personal reflection of the way in which the artist sees the world. Following murals in Vienna, France, the US, UK, Australia, and Tunisia, “Sentir,” which translates to “to feel,” is an affecting tribute to the ties between the natural world and human sensation.

by CaroPosted on

With Art Basel Miami around the corner, international artists are now trickling in to Miami’s local gallery scene. Puerto Rican street artist Alexis Diaz has returned with his solo show “SUPERFICIE” (“SURFACE”), now on view at Product/81 gallery in Wynwood. His large scale murals (previously featured here and here) are instantly recognizable for their colorful, hybrid animals. In recent months, motfis of raven heads with human elements such as hands or skulls are especially prevalent. Diaz’s exhibition showcases a series of new paintings that mirror this dreamlike, or perhaps nightmarish, subject matter.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

A few weeks ago, we gave readers a small taste of the many, enormous murals that went up at We AArt Festival in Aalborg, Denmark (see our coverage of Aryz, Escif and Kenor’s walls here). The festival was envisioned as a way to bring more public art to the mid-sized city and featured international artists with a penchant for large-scale work that Hi-Fructose readers will recognize. Interesni Kazki, a duo from Ukraine known for their storybook-like murals, split up and tackled two separate walls. Puerto Rican artist Alexis Diaz typically draws inspiration from the natural world for his depictions of hybridized creatures. His piece for We AArt depicts a skeletal horse encased in an armor of tree branches with an ink-like technique atypical of outdoor work. Other artists included Jaz, Liqen, Don John and Fintan Magee. Check out photos of the murals below.

by Elizabeth MaskaskyPosted on

Over the past several years, Puerto Rican-born street artist Alexis Diaz has built an international presence, with giant murals covering everywhere from the side of a crumbling building in Bratislava, Slovakia to a makeshift billboard in the middle of the Arizona desert. The artist is known for his chimerical and dreamlike depictions of animals in a state of metamorphosis. Diaz often works collectively with friend and fellow street artist Juan Fernandez; when collaborating together, the group calls themselves “La Pandilla” (or “The Gang”). Both Diaz’s solo work and that of La Pandilla demonstrate a deep interest in transfiguration; animals morph into one another, human hands and skulls become wings and snail shells and creatures are transformed into ships and submarines to be used for the transport of other animal subjects. Diaz’s signature style is the use of tiny black brushstrokes on white to render his creatures, making them look like highly-detailed pen-and-ink drawings. These ‘drawings’ stand out all the more for being set against their bright teal, blue, and sunset-colored backdrops.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on


Interesni Kazki detail

While the collectors were busy at the fairs during Miami Art Week, street artists descended upon the Wynwood neighborhood to add new murals to the urban landscape, with thousands of eager tourists with cameras at the ready following not far behind. While many murals from past years have been preserved, we spotted new additions by the likes of Interesni Kazki, Nychos (who painted five separate walls), Faith47, Alexis Diaz, Swoon, Cleon Peterson, and many others. Colorful new pieces spilled out of the designated Wynwood Walls area and into the neighborhood. Several artists, such as Pixel Pancho, So Youn Lee, Nychos, and Bikismo, painted at the Jose de Diego Middle School, where, as we learned, arts funding has recently been cut. Check out some of our street art highlights below.