by CaroPosted on

Swoon and Monica Canilao are two artists who are well known for their epic installations and mixed media pieces that utilize debris that they have collected and rebuilt. We first featured Swoon’s work in Hi-Fructose Vol 36, and have featured Canilao’s dreamy works on our blog, each unique for her use of media and techniques, but sharing a quality that makes us reconnect with things that are “lost and found”.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Currently on display at Galleria Patricia Armocida in Milan, Italy, “The Folding of a Known World” is a seamless collaboration among three distinct American talents: Swoon, Monica Canilao and Dennis McNett. McNett’s ferocious animal characters usually occupy a blank page, while Swoon’s surreal, cut-out portraits adapt to whatever context they are pasted into. When joined with the found-object dream world installations of Canilao, however, McNett and Swoon’s large-scale woodblock print characters appear to settle into their natural home. Read more after the jump!

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

If an apocalypse destroyed civilizationand we had to rebuild, it would definitely be a good idea to stick byMonica Canilao and Bunnie Reiss. This weekend, the two artistspremiered their three-room installation, “Little Old One,” at LoPo Gallery, convertingthe space into a veritable other-worldly habitat. Reiss and Canilaoreconfigured mundane materials into a ritualistic, meditativeshelter, arranging worn textiles and antiquated furs into geometric patternsthat radiated out of the walls.

Baroque and overwhelming to the senses,the work incorporates drawings, doilies, crystals, beads, embroidery, photographs and a variety of other found materials that come together in an organized chaos. It’s difficultnot to think of early feminist artistslike Judy Chicago and Miriam Schapiro, who similarly createdinstallations out of a domestic space. The mannequins withpapier-mache bird heads stand proudly like female deities in the backroom, reaffirming a strong connection between craft and nature, aswell as the natural ambiance of the work.

by Ken HarmanPosted on

Photographer Benjamin Mortimer recently sent us this preview of Monica Canilao’s latest works, which he shot in preparation for Canilao’s upcoming show “We Are Dust”. Monica, who’s a long-time Swoon collaborator and compatriot, has created an impressively large and complex craft-based body of work that seems to fringe, almost literally, on the memories of a forgotten time while simultaneously examining the fragility of a forgotten people. “We Are Dust” will be Monica’s first ever New York show, and debuts April 30th at Cinders Gallery in Brooklyn. More pictures here.

by Ken HarmanPosted on

Last weekend we stopped by the Oakland, CA studio of Monica Canilao, who we hadn’t seen since last year’s studio visit. Since then, the artist has relocated to the Yard Dogs complex, a hub of creative types ranging from musicians to sword swallowers to artists, tucked away in a West Oakland compound.

by JL SchnabelPosted on

Recently opened at Sky High Gallery is a solo exhibition ofnew works, ‘What’s Lost Is Safe’ by Oakland basedartist Monica Canilao. The epic installation is a shrine dedicated to olddebris and forgotten things made sacred, collected and built by the prolificartist over the course of a week in Milwaukee where the gallery is based. Thissite-specific foraging adds an urgent and organic energy to the manipulated,antique photographs and woven textile totems enshrined within the installation.Using a unique mixture of medias and techniques, the works and installationblend seamless within the walls of the gallery; reborn as a communal site ofworship for the free wanderers of our generation seeking a connection with allthat is lost and found. Take a peek at more of the installation after the jump.