by CaroPosted on

Hyper-realist painter Maria Teicher, featured here, likens the experience of being an artist to being in high school. As a student, she felt like an outcast who didn’t quite fit in, a “loner” forced into an artificial social dynamic. Teicher explores this theme in per paintings, which portray people in powerless moments, often wrapped in “veils” that distort their faces. Her work almost stops your breath, not only for her impressive use of the oil medium, but because you can feel the moment of constriction. For her latest body of work “Here Together, So Alone” at Arch Enemy Arts in Philadelphia, Teicher observes how we group ourselves together as humans while remaining inexplicably alone.

by Victoria Casal-DataPosted on

Philadelphia-based artist Maria Teicher’s latest body of work focuses on portraits and narrative paintings that feature disturbing yet delicate compositions. Each tells stories based on personal experiences in a very concise yet mysterious way. The open-ended yet evocative works give viewers a space to relate and “bring one’s own experiences into each piece.” In an effort to convey sentiments of suffering or powerlessness, Teicher’s portraits often disguise, constrict and deform the human face. In her latest paintings, she tightly veils her subjects with clear or opaque plastic bags, playing with her audience’s boundaries and fears.

by CaroPosted on

As the saying goes, “the best things come in small packages”. Philadelphia gallery Arch Enemy Arts has challenged artists to create their smallest works to date for their annual group show, “Small Wonders”. For its fourth installment in a row, “Small Wonders 4” features over 75 small pieces by artists from all over the world, including 64 Colors, Alex Garant, Brian Mashburn, Caitlin Hackett, Caitlin McCormack, Craww, Hanna Jaeun, Maria Teicher, Matthew Greskiewicz, and many more. As with previous showings, all the work is sized under 12 inches.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

The forces of good and evil clash in an apocalyptic new group show, “The Fall of the Watchers,” at Philadelphia’s Arch Enemy Arts. The concept of the exhibit was inspired by the Book of Enoch, an ancient Jewish text that details the tale of the Watchers, angels sent to Earth and subsequently corrupted by humanity’s hedonistic ways. While the work in “The Fall of the Watchers” is not overtly religious or even moralistic, artists like David Seidman, Caitlin Hackett, Chris Mars and Maria Teicher created a creeping, ominous mood reflective of the show’s inspiration. The participants vary greatly in style and media — from watercolor to miniature sculpture — but their work shares an underlying tension and sense of foreboding. “The Fall of the Watchers” is on view through November 2. Take a look at some work from the show below.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Animals have traditionally been a major part of allegories — from biblical stories to Ancient Greek myths — because of the human impulse to empathize with other creatures and see ourselves in them. For their group show, “Fauna,” Arch Enemy Arts in Philadelphia chose artists who use animals as protagonists in their work. Featuring the work of Hannah Yata, Caitlin Hackett, Robert Kraiza, Cory Benhatzel and more, the show dabbles heavily in anthropomorphism in its depictions of nature. “Fauna” is on view through September 29. Check out these opening night photos courtesy of Maria Teicher after the jump.

by Sponsored PostPosted on

beinArt Gallery presents Small Works 2016. This group exhibition features over 55 of the most highly skilled and imaginative artists in the new contemporary art movement. With all works under 10” x 10” (25.4 x 25.4cm) this greatly anticipated exhibition will offer collectors a rare opportunity to acquire affordable art from a host of internationally celebrated artists. Opens Saturday, September 17, 6pm – 9pm. Runs until October 9. See complete online preview.