by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

On June 13, Korean painter Kwon Kyungyup (featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 24) and Japanese painter Kazuki Takamatsu (Hi-Fructose Vol. 16) will debut two solo shows at Rome’s Dorothy Circus Gallery: Kwon’s “White Elegy” and Takamatsu’s “Because I’m a Doll.” Both working with a frosty, white color palette, the two artists cultivate placid worlds populated by characters that deceptively seem untouched by human flaws. Read more and see more artwork from both artists after the jump!

by CaroPosted on

“I believe that artists should speak about the most desperate and desirable issues for humanity,” says Korean painter Kwon Kyung-Yup. Though known for her realistic portraits of melancholy subjects, first featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 24, Kwon describes herself as a happy person whose paintings are about recalling memories. Her works find an emotional balance between her artistic inspirations, citing the beauty in Klimt’s paintings which she pairs with tragedy, as found in the works of Caravaggio.

by CaroPosted on

A new exhibit opening today at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art aims to take a snap shot of the ever growing New Contemporary “school”. It’s class? Many will be familiar to Hi-Fructose readers: Andrew Hem (HF Vol. 21 cover artist), Curiot (Hf Vol. 29), Ekundayo (HF Vol. 9), Erik Jones (HF Vol. 27 cover artist), Kwon Kyungyup (HF Vol. 24), Natalia Fabia (HF Vol. 22), Scott Radke (Hf Vol. 6), Yoskay Yamamoto (HF Vol. 8), and Yosuke Ueno (HF Vol. 10), to name a few. The exhibition will also include an abstract installation by artist Brett Amory (HF Vol. 20). “Invisible College”, which is co-curated by the museum’s Josef Zimmerman and Thinkspace Gallery in Los Angeles, presents New Contemporary as a movement that is both traditionally inspired and non traditional. See more after the jump.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

On October 10, Dorothy Circus Gallery will open “Inside her Eyes,” a group show featuring an international group of rising female artists at the Palazzo Valentini in Rome. Kwon Kyungyup’s fragile-looking, bandaged heroines will hang alongside Francesca Romana Di Nunzio’s statue-esque sculptures of Amazon-like women, Afarin Sajedi’s strange portraits, Natalie Shau’s pop surrealist paintings and other works. Take a look at our preview of the show courtesy of Dorothy Circus Gallery.

by CaroPosted on

We’ve been steadily following the expansion of Thinkspace Gallery in Los Angeles into overseas territory with their ongoing ‘LAX’ exhibition series. Their latest collaboration is with StolenSpace Gallery in London, which debuted last night, and it is perhaps their most massive at 136 artists and over 140 works of art. In the tradition of the series, “LAX/LHR” showcases an eclectic mixture from painting, mixed media, and sculptural pieces by both local and international artists alike. There is an especially heavy volume of contributors from the urban art persuasion, considering the gallery’s ties with British street artist D*Face.

by Roxanne GoldbergPosted on

Inside a run-down building off Berlin’s Nollendorfplatz, an area known historically for both its gay culture and punk community, 12 artists from eight countries (Fernando Chamarelli, João Ruas, Alexis Diaz (La Pandilla), NoseGo, Word to Mother, Curiot, Low Bros, Andrew Schoultz, Glenn Barr, C215, Dabs Myla, and JBAK) worked for two days to create original artworks for the facades and windows of the currently unused site (exciting news about the future of this space to come).