by CaroPosted on

In his ongoing project “Cement Eclipses”, Issac Cordal takes an unconventional approach to observing our behavior as a social mass. His alluring and surprising miniature cement figures placed in public locations, featured in our new issue and here on our blog over the years, reveal scenes that zoom in the routine tasks of the contemporary human being. The Spanish artist describes his work as “quickly opening doors to other worlds”, often where the “unwelcome” or unfortunate are welcoming the viewer to consider the issues that face the real world.

by CaroPosted on

Isaac Cordal has been leaving his sculptures of tiny cement figures in cities all over the world for years. Featured on our blog, his artworks hidden in plain sight feature gloomy people wading helplessly in puddles, other times peering through cracks in the sidewalk and concrete walls. They are part of an ongoing series that he calls “Cement Eclipses”. Cordal explains, “Cement Eclipses is a critical definition of our behavior as a social mass. The art work intends to catch the attention on our devalued relation with the nature through a critical look to the collateral effects of our evolution.” The Spanish artist recently updated his site with his latest works, installed in New York City in November.

by CaroPosted on

Spanish artist Isaac Cordal recently made Montreal, Canada his playground by hiding miniature cement figures around the city. Covered here on our blog, his art reflects on society by recreating scenes of everyday life with a sense of gloom. In a way, it is a combination of sculpture and photography- a photo can speak a thousand words when it captures his work at just the right moment. For his upcoming exhibition “Urban Inertia” at C.O.A. Gallery, Cordal placed his figures in muddy puddles, cracks in sidewalks and walls, and other unassuming places.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

With his sculptures of multitudes of identical, disaffected, middle-aged men, Isaac Cordal critiques modern society’s emphasis on work and productivity. In our contemporary capitalist system, everything is thought of as a potential way to make profit — like public universities, which are becoming increasingly privatized and unaffordable here in the United States and in countries all over the world. This is the subject of Cordal’s latest piece, “The School,” where he imagines a university as a nightmarish factory with a skeletal overlord shouting instructions from a watchtower.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Most aspiring artists’ dream is to quit their 9-to-5. Isaac Cordal’s miniature sculptures make us acutely aware of the soul-sucking nature of a creatively unstimulating environment driven by habit and routine. Cordal molds legions of tiny, middle-aged men in suits who navigate dreary, oppressive environments. He places them in dioramas and sometimes even outdoors, creating scenes by utilizing elements of the existing architecture. His solo show “Moments de Solitude” opens on February 5 at Spacejunk Art Centers in Bayonne, France and will be on view there through April 4. The exhibit will travel to Spacejunk’s other locations in Lyon (April 16 through June 6) and Grenoble (June 19 through July 25).

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Spanish artist Isaac Cordal has an unconventional approach to public art. While most street artists seek to work on an increasingly larger scale, painting the facades of buildings with the aid cherry pickers, Cordal builds miniature sculptures that he hides in unexpected places. Perhaps a critique of capitalism (in Cordal’s native country, the world-wide economic recession hit especially hard), Cordal’s work focuses on the mass-produced quality of today’s society. Miniature business men in suits are found in forgotten corners of urban sprawl. Cordal uses his environment to stage poignant scenes with the sculptures as his protagonists. Isaac Cordal is opening his debut US solo show at Anno Domini in San Jose, CA tonight, September 5, and the show will run through October 19. Take a look at some of Cordal’s work for the show as well as some street interventions after the jump.