by CaroPosted on

When we say goodbye to the things we once loved, we face feelings of loneliness and nostalgia. Artist Caitlin McCormack experienced these feelings when her grandparents passed away, and she found comfort in crochet, a family tradition: “My grandmother was a very talented crocheter, and my grandfather was an exceptionally-skilled bird carver. Something about the receptive process of crocheting seemed to help me to cope with their absence.” McCormack’s delicate crocheted designs of animal skeletons come from death, but she uses them to reconstruct memories from life.

by CaroPosted on

We are in the season where skeletons appear everywhere, in every iteration from the cute to the eerie and downright disturbing. Philadelphia based artist Caitlin McCormack delicately crochets replicas of animal remains that make us look at skeletons in a new way. Her vintage-looking works embody both the beauty and eerie qualities of skeletons, while evoking the spirit of the life they once had. On October 23rd, she will exhibit a new series of crocheted skeletons in her upcoming exhibition at Paradigm Gallery in Philadelphia. Titled “Mnemosyne”, named after the Greek goddess of memory, McCormack’s works explore the idea of reconstructing memories.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Hari & Deepti

Arch Enemy Arts’ current group show, Pulp 2, is the gallery’s annual works on paper affair, with this crop including Matt Gordon, Kit Mizeres, Caitlin McCormack, Thomas Ascott, and several others. The Philadelphia spot hosts the show through Jan. 30. This is the second installment of Pulp, which debuted last year.

by CaroPosted on

As the saying goes, “the best things come in small packages”. Philadelphia gallery Arch Enemy Arts has challenged artists to create their smallest works to date for their annual group show, “Small Wonders”. For its fourth installment in a row, “Small Wonders 4” features over 75 small pieces by artists from all over the world, including 64 Colors, Alex Garant, Brian Mashburn, Caitlin Hackett, Caitlin McCormack, Craww, Hanna Jaeun, Maria Teicher, Matthew Greskiewicz, and many more. As with previous showings, all the work is sized under 12 inches.

by CaroPosted on

On August 15th, New York welcomed a new gallery, Haven Gallery, with their inaugural exhibition inspired by the idea of safe havens. Their first group of artists have wide ranging styles, many sharing whimsical qualities: Matt Dangler, Kukula (HF Vol. 7), Kari-lise Alexander, Nicomi Nix Turner, Dan Quintana (HF Vol. 27), Shaun Berke, Tom Bagshaw, Naoto Hattori (HF Vol. 7), Zoe Byland, Brian Mashburn, Regan Rosburg, Aunia Kahn, Caitlin McCormack, Rose Freymuth-Frazier, Redd Walitzki, and Nom Kinnear King. Their subjects span still life, landscapes, and figurative works, suggesting that refuge can be found both in the physical as well as within oneself.

by CaroPosted on

Stephen Romano Gallery in Brooklyn has assembled a rather eerie exhibition in cooperation with Morbid Anatomy Museum that pairs contemporary works with a wide variety of vernacular photography, folk sculpture, spirit photography, and more. “OPUS HYPNAGOGIA: Sacred Spaces of the Visionary and Vernacular” takes a look at creative enlightenment over the centuries, and explores our ongoing fascination with mental phenomena like Hypnagogia. On display will be recent works by the likes of Martin Wittfooth (HF Vol. 19 cover artist), Kris Kuksi (first covered in HF Vol. 19), Caitlin McCormack, El Gato Chimney, Rithika Merchant, and Hunter Stabler whose creations share a surreal quality or supernatural theme.