by Genevive ZacconiPosted on

With twisting tentacles, complex color schemes and a candy-coated iridescence as his trademarks, Adam Wallacavage creates one-of-a-kind lighting ensembles from his Philadelphia home. A veritable museum of art and design, his ever-evolving residence features a bevy of contemporary paintings, handcrafted ornamentation and turn-of-the-century antiques — serving as the perfect showroom for his work and an inspiring backdrop for its creation. Hi-Fructose recently visited Adam to take a behind the scenes look at his studio, process and art. Check out our exclusive images after the jump!

by Genevive ZacconiPosted on

This past Saturday, Jonathan Levine Gallery in NYC hosted a packed reception for three concurrent solo shows, Tara McPherson’s “Wandering Luminations”, Masakatsu Sashie’s “Coacervate”, and Adam Wallacavage’s “Magic Mountain”. If you missed the opening, you can still view the artwork, which will remain on display until November 16. Read more after the jump and enjoy Hi-Fructose’s exclusive event photos courtesy of Kevin Wilson.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Tomorrow, October 19, Jonathan LeVine Gallery in New York will open three side-by-side solo shows, Masakatsu Sashie’s “Coacervate,” Adam Wallacavage’s “Magic Mountain” and Tara McPherson’s “Wandering Luminations.” The three artists, though disparate in their techniques and subject matter, each strike a chord with contemporary preoccupations. Japanese artist Masakatsu Sashie (featured in HF Vol. 28) bases his work on the scientific concept of the coacervate, which is a droplet-like formation of molecules at the core of Alexander Oparin’s hypothesis of the origin of life. Sashie says that his work is an appreciation of the beauty in our surroundings, including he debris and decay, but his work takes an a less optimistic dimension when one examines the floating, toxic bubbles of waste floating through his apocalyptic landscapes. Read more after the jump.

by Jane KenoyerPosted on

Influenced by 16th Century Baroque opulence and Gothic design, Adam Wallacavage’s Shiny Monsters show at the Philadelphia Art Alliance, is as sumptuous as it is unusual. His current solo exhibition is an installation project consisting of multiple gallery spaces that showcase his exquisite and bizarre chandeliers. Some of his recent works in the show featuring toys and Hello Kitty iconography are inspired by pop culture and Wallacavage’s love of vintage Americana. Feast your eyes on more after the jump!

by JL SchnabelPosted on

Recently opened at Philadelphia’s Art Alliance was the solo exhibition of new sculptures, ‘Shiny Monsters’ by Philly based artist Adam Wallacavage (whose studio we visited here) Elaborating on his signature aesthetic, the jewel colored rooms were filled with a menagerie of sea creature chandeliers, including his infamous wild armed, candy hued Octopi among new additions such as dragon-esque headed beasts. Lowly lit, the rooms were filled with the lattice like shadows of the tentacles, adding an unexpected element of wonder to the work. View more opening night photos after the jump, here on Hi-Fructose.

by JL SchnabelPosted on

Located on the main street that cuts through the city of brotherly love, photographer and chandelier architect Adam Wallacavage has created his incredible home and studio. Feeling akin to a modern pop museum, glittering candy colored chandeliers hang in rooms filled with art, chattering love birds and odd collections of nostalgic objects. On the top floor of this colorful and hypnotizing cosmos is Wallacavage’s studio where we had a chance to interview the artist as he prepares for his show at Choque Cultural in Sao Paulo, Brazil. More after the jump.