by Andy SmithPosted on


Photo: Kate Russell

Since last year, buzz has swirled around an art complex in Santa Fe, N.M., a former bowling alley converted into a blending of a “jungle gym, haunted house, children’s museum, and immersive art exhibit.” Meow Wolf is the production company behind the effort, and its crown jewel is the 20,000 square foot interactive art experience “House of Eternal Return.” In this post, we take a look inside the massive exhibit.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Manga artist Shintaro Kago subverts the form in his provocative, occasionally grotesque narratives. In one tale, in particular, the typical panels become three-dimension vessels, from which his characters break out and manipulate. “Abstraction” shows off both Kago’s knack for the unsettling and the satirical.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Francisco Esnayra

When you’re faced with fairs measured in dozens, visiting every Miami Art Week offering isn’t feasible if you really want to enjoy it. Our suggestion: Check their social feeds or websites and pick a couple fairs that speak to you. Each one is going to offer some surprises. And even in repeat visits to events like Art Miami and Spectrum Miami, we saw gems that eluded us the first time around.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Merrilee Challiss

Enormous works—and in particular, sculptures and installations—tend to garner the biggest crowds at these fairs. But tucked away in several corners across Miami Art Week are gems worthy of recognition. Below, we’ve highlighted two more fairs that deserve a visit if you’re in Miami this week—both with an emphasis on curation.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Jordan Wolfson

In this installment, we focus on the big one. As daunting and seemingly endless as Art Basel Miami Beach can seem, the the 500,000 square-feet of exhibition space yields opportunities to see both worthy emerging and trusted talent alongside the other. The sampling size is quite massive: more than 4,000 artists and more than 200 galleries represented.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Mia Brownell, a Chicago-based artist and daughter of a sculptor and biophysicist, has a new body of work that she says “simultaneously draw on scientific images of platelets (tiny blood cells shaped like plates) and the history of the painted food still life.” The new series is called “Plate to Platelets: and other things that travel and bind,” and it features several new palette paintings. Brownell is featured in the Hi-Fructose Collected 4 Boxset.