by Andy SmithPosted on

Los Angeles-based Kiel Johnson has created suits, miniature cityscapes, and cameras with cardboard. Yet, one of his most recent sculptures emulates something even more unexpected: an aircraft. Johnson was featured way back in Hi-Fructose Vol. 14, and in 2013, we featured his crowdsourced cardboard robots.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Gosia, a Poland-born, Toronto-based sculptor, creates feminine figures with touches of the surreal, whether reflecting the natural world or expressions that extend from inside of the characters themselves. Each of these sculptures contain both elegance and emotional complexity, often containing a new sense of drama at each angle. The artist was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 41, and she was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Sam Gibbons, an Ohio native currently based in Baltimore, paints vibrant cartoons that take strange, often dark turns. These works are often crafted on wood or MDF panels, with edges specifically cut for his creations. Gibbons was the cover artists for Hi-Fructose Vol. 9, and he is also part of the exhibit “Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose,” a collaboration between the magazine and Virginia MOCA. Here, his recent work shows the artist’s evolution in developing his engrossing, humorous displays.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Kenne Grégoire, a painter often associated with the movement New Dutch Realism, moves between still-life paintings and more surreal scenes that capture a humane sadness and other complex emotions, rendered in acrylics. The artist uses techniques derived from the 17th century, yet he approaches his work in a way that pushes the form, twisting perspective and hues to create ambiguous points of view and situations.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Japanese artist Takako Yuki’s fantastical ceramic art evokes both feelings of whimsy and uneasiness, with beings that seem birthed from fairytales and the natural world. These often-child-friendly creations contain flourishes of sadness and strangeness. The artist says that there are several emotions at play in the process of forging these works.

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More and More, a London-based design studio, strives to create 3D imagery and video that has both a “distinctive and unexpected tone of voice.” Launched just last year by Carl Burgess and Tom Darracott, the studio breathes life and realistic motion into inflatable characters, delicate fur, and other uncommon material. The group even mesmerizes with a golden ribbon, piling onto itself.