by Andy SmithPosted on

Lucy Glendinning’s figures carry absorbing, yet unsettling textures alien to the human body. The artist uses material like wax, duck feathers, timber, jesmonite, glass, and other materials for her strange, often fetal-positioned characters. For some, Glendinning’s work may recall the feather-based sculptures of Kate MccGwire, last featured on HiFructose.com here. A past statement offers some insight on Glendinning’s vision.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Christopher R. Doran, known as Click Mort to the art world, has passed away. The visual artist and musician was known for his “recapitated figures,” using parts of separate ceramic figures to create hybrid, surreal creatures. He was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 34 and on HiFructose.com here and here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Bahamas native Lavar Munroe‘s 2D and 3D works blend real-world, bleak experiences and mythology. His works can appear at once visceral and intimate in their execution. Through his sculptures of humans and canines, as well as his mixed-media scenes, the artist “maps a personal journey of survival and trauma in a world of gang violence, drugs, murder, self-discovery, development and overcoming obstacles through self-determination,” Jack Bell Gallery says.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Olivia Kemp’s massive drawings, mostly rendered in pen, contain a preposterous amount of detail. Her work often contains historical structures enveloped by the natural world. The drawings can take months at a time to complete.

by Andy SmithPosted on

It’s been five years since our last HF Collected Box Set, and “Collected 4” has been in the works for quite a while. Only 2500 copies of the box set are being produced. Pre-order today to reserve a copy here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Painter Kehinde Wiley was recently chosen by former President Barack Obama to paint his official portrait for the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery. Wiley should be familiar to Hi-Fructose readers: His work appeared on the cover of Hi-Fructose Vol. 36 and was featured in the exhibition “Turn the Page: The First 10 Years of Hi-Fructose.”