by CaroPosted on

San Francisco based artist Joel Daniel Phillips examines the characters living in his neighborhood in larger than life-sized drawings. His subjects include street vendors and the homeless, each with a unique personality that Phillips captures in hyper-realistic detail. His ongoing series explores themes like how these individuals use objects to retain a sense of home, and promotes social justice.

by Nathan SpoorPosted on

In her studio in Cardedeu, a small town near Barcelona, Spain, Cinta Vidal Agulló is busy creating complex acrylic paintings on wood panels that reflect how our external realities often do not reflect our internal natures. Vidal Agulló sees her work as a metaphor for the ways in which we shape our world – the impossibility of completely understanding those around us, yet the personal ability to navigate the maze of life that we all inhabit.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

With her solo show “Dual Natures,” Mary Porterfield draws from her work as an occupational therapist to ask herself what makes an act heroic and what is the limit of our ability to help others. Over realistic landscapes, Porterfield creates complex narratives filled with mythical creatures, mortals, and saints. The artist uses these dual images to explore the contradictory impulses to be selfless and still prioritize self-care, using nature as a metaphor for the things she cannot control. “Dual Natures” opens at Packer Schopf Gallery in Chicago on May 8.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Together known is KeFe, Kelly Tunstall and Ferris Plock are getting ready to debut their third solo show at Fecal Face in San Francisco tonight. Titled “Inside Voices,” the exhibition features playful, colorful collaborative paintings. The artists culled inspiration for these works from their experiences with parenting two young boys. The term “inside voice” is often used to quiet children, which can, in effect, stifle their self-expression when it’s inconvenient to adults. KeFe reclaimed this term and made it a more liberating one, describing their conception of an “inside voice” as the inner voice that guides one’s creativity. By following this internal teacher, they created work that brims with a childlike sense of curiosity.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Maximo Reira has a background in painting, photography, and sculpture, the latter of which he applies to his innovative, functional furniture designs. For his new “Animal Chairs” series, he sculpted large, realistic animals such as octopi, rhinos, and whales, using part of their bodies to create a throne-like seat. Mostly monochromatic with a natural color palette, the chairs have an elegant and otherworldly quality to them.

by CaroPosted on

Scott Hove’s (Hi-Fructose Collected 3) art is much more than just three dimensional cake- it also tells story. His former studio in San Francisco, better known as “Cakeland”, featured a funhouse made of sweet, yet nightmarish cake sculptures. Now living and working in Los Angeles, Hove brings a piece of Cakeland to his current exhibition, “Pussy Jihad” at La Luz de Jesus Gallery. This exhibit plays with opposing ideals in society, while taking a look at the ethos of masculinity and femininity.