by Andy SmithPosted on

Dan Gluibizzi, a Portland-based artist, mixes acrylics and watercolors for his works, each a collection of portraits that together create social examinations. Whether his subjects are in business attire or unclothed, an intimacy carries throughout the sparse works. The artist scours the Internet, specifically nudist blogs and Tumblrs, for inspiration in creating his paintings.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Tatsuya Tanaka’s photographs combines normal objects and tiny figures to craft surreal scenes. A phone becomes a fishing hole; a whistle becomes a slide. In each of these daily works, the artist uses scale and humor to make us re-examine the items we use each day. The blissful creations are part of an ongoing, daily project. An enormous catalog of these scenes goes back to April of 2011.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Bart Nijstad, an artist based in the Netherlands, creates surreal portraits that move between pop and everyday subjects. Though the artist would say that his topics and environments can be considered “sober and Dutch.” He uses different mediums in accomplishing this, including gouache, watercolor, and pencil.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Andy Ristaino is an Emmy-winning artist known for being the lead character designer, writer, and background artist on the TV show Adventure Time. Ristaino’s hand always seem to be at work, whether it’s the show’s elegant, detail-packed title cards on the crowded drawings he scratches onto napkins and placemats. Both highlight the artist’s talent for making every corner of the page work for him.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Toshihiko Mitsuya’s aluminum foil and metal creations range from the mythical to the natural. More recent work reflects nature’s flora and fauna, creating entire gardens and forest habitats in staggering, delicate detail. When paired alongside actual plantlife, the effect is both maintained and amplified.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Amsterdam-based artist Stefan Glerum creates retrofuturistic illustrations, in a distinctively clear yet vibrant style. At times, these worlds appear closer to our own than we would want them to, depicting obsessions with technology and a desperation that recalls the speculative sci-fi of yesterday. This style lends itself to the artist’s commercial work, in which the artist’s work is distinguished in its off-kilter take on a variety of topics.