by CaroPosted on

Fans of recently featured duo Pip & Pop will enjoy Japanese artist Yuko Kanatani, one of their inspirations. Kanatani recently gained international momentum after the launch of her Nike sneakers and ‘Tight of the Moment’ line, which features her psychedelic designs. Her works comprise of drawings, paintings, animation, and immersive large-scale installations where one feels like they are walking into a kaleidoscope. Her bright and dazzling ornamental imagery represents varying emotions, and themes of infinity and movement.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Hellion Gallery in Portland has become an unlikely purveyor of Japanese contemporary art thanks to curator Matt Wagner, who makes frequent trips to Tokyo and is well-acquainted with the scene there. Their next exhibition is Hideyuki Katsumata’s “Hide in my Brain,” a collection of loud, unapologetically obscene paintings debuting on April 2. Spirits and demons engaging strange, erotic activities abound in Katsumata’s unhinged compositions — which he fills with hallucinatory colors and brisk line work. “Hide in my Brain” will be his first solo show in the US, and, as the title suggests, it offers great insight into the artist’s strange mind.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Continuing their 10 year anniversary celebration, “Oh, the Places We’ve Been” is a group exhibit showcasing the core artists that have helped shape New York’s Jonathan LeVine Gallery into what it is today. Street art pioneers like Blek Le Rat and Dan Witz will have their work hanging beside that of artists with a more illustrative style, such as Tara McPherson, Gary Taxali, and Gary Baseman. More expressionistic painters will be featured, as well: Brett Amory, Natalia Fabia, and Esao Andrews all have work in the show also. Check out our preview below before “Oh, the Places We’ve Been” opens on April 2.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Lauren YS’ studio is located in a sprawling Oakland co-op that once housed an architecture office. The gigantic drafting tables its original tenants left behind proved to be useful while she worked on her new body of work for her solo show, “Devil’s Jelly,” opening at Cotton Candy Machine in Brooklyn on April 18. Her surreal drawings and paintings feature shape-shifting female characters that seem to embody the artist’s various dreams — as well as fears and anxieties. YS interjects punches of striking neon colors that match her work’s bold attitude. Today, we take a look behind the scenes of “Devil’s Jelly” before her work travels to New York.

by CaroPosted on

Washington based artist Andrea Joyce Heimer classifies her work as “outsider art”, or paintings of strange suburbia. Her solo exhibition at the Good Luck Gallery in Los Angeles, “Suburban Mythology: Volume 2″, is a continuation of her main theme: every day dramas full of dark humor, based on real people and events in Heimer’s life. Her simple and flat visual style recalls artists like Mark Whalen, Mel Kadel, or Deedee Cheriel, but this can be mis-leading. Heimer fills her scenes with personal symbolism.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

For their third anniversary, Arch Enemy Arts in Philadelphia decided to celebrate with three simultaneous exhibitions: a group show, a customization show, and a print show. The centerpiece of this trifecta is “Imaginary Menagerie: The Arch Enemy Arts Guide to Cryptozoology Vol. 1.” As the long-winded title suggests, Arch Enemy Arts invited a large group of artists to create works based on their chosen mythical beasts. For many of the artists in the show — like Erika Sanada (HF Vol. 31), Naoto Hattori (HF Vol. 35), and Caitlin Hackett (HF Vol. 17) — this theme is already their specialty. “Imaginary Menagerie” opens on April 3, as well as the other two shows, “Stacked” and “Full Bleed.”