by CaroPosted on

Last Saturday night, Richard Heller gallery in Los Angeles debuted Hideaki Kawashima’s latest painting series, “Back and Forth”. The Tokyo based artist was in attendance and discussed his artwork with us in his native language. He commented on how over the years, he has developed stylistically, and this show is representative of that. There is a visual exploration that ocurrs in subtle nuances of color, detail and expression. This portrait series is both simpler, yet more expressive than previous works. It’s referring to the ‘back and forth’ of emotions felt by the artist during the creation process, and by the viewer looking at them.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Chilean painter Guillermo Lorca Garcia-Huidobro creates monumental works on canvas with compositions that always seem to ascend in an upward spiral. In one piece, the viewer gazes up at a larger-than-life teenage girl while a child, miniature in comparison, clings on to her for safety. In another piece, various creatures scale a barren, crooked tree trunk that looks more like a tree of death than a tree of life, with a little girl attempting to escape the vulture’s nest at the top. Lorca Garcia-Hiodobro executes his surrealist vision with loose brush strokes that leave details muddled and backgrounds incomplete, inviting the open-ended images to mingle with the viewers’ own childhood nightmares and anxieties.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

In our current issue print issue, Hi-Fructose Vol. 33, writer Silke Tudor speaks to influential designer and illustrator Syd Mead, the 80 year-old-artist known for his concept work in Blade Runner, Aliens and TRON. In the feature, Mead discusses his fascination with mechanical designs and his unique, technical approach as an illustrator. His science fiction-tinged work calls to mind a utopian vision that puts forth in hope of a better future. “If we start rehearsing a dismal world, that’s the way we’ll end up,” he tells Tudor in the article. “I hope all these dystopian shoot-em-ups are cathartic — I truly hope that they are. In the meantime, I’m doing my small part to visualize a glossy, egalitarian — that means everyone does their part or it doesn’t work — technically advanced society that produces a workable future, and a nicer place to live. That’s what I want.” Check out a few of Mead’s iconic artworks below and learn more about the artist in Hi-Fructose Vol. 33.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Troy Coulterman’s resin sculptures evoke the vibrant colors and over-the-top expressions of animations and graphic novels. His illustrative style is somewhat unexpected to experience in three-dimensions. The Canadian artist (who was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 27) recently debuted an exhibition in his hometown, Regina, Saskatchewan, at the MacKenzie Art Gallery. Titled “Digital Handshake,” the show takes inspiration from the abstract ways we communicate online. In the candy-colored sculptures, figures appear to dissolve into pixel-like blocks. In the show’s centerpiece, a man and a woman are separated by an abstract mass — perhaps a metaphor for the barrier we put between ourselves and the world as we increasingly opt for digital experiences over physical ones.

by CaroPosted on

HF Vol. 23 artist Mark Dean Veca celebrated the opening of “Everlast” (previewed here) last weekend at Western Project, Los Angeles. His pop culture fused, immaculate paintings and drawings are inspired by 1970s signage and cartoons. Looney Tunes characters like Tweety and the Tasmanian Devil are literally given a new twist in Veca’s style, whose linework makes them appear twisting and organic. The psycheldia of the 70s is also apparent in his Fender and Zildjian logos, breathing attitude into these corporate identities. Photos after the jump!

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Long Beach Museum of Art (LBMA) presents Masterworks: Defining A New Narrative opening October 23. Masterworks consists of 14 large-scale paintings by accomplished artists who have been charged with providing a singular work that could be considered pivotal in their careers. Coinciding with the exhibition opening, the museum will present its premiere event LBMA After Dark featuring live entertainment from 7pm-10pm. For more information please visitwww.lbma.org.