by CaroPosted on

Washington based artist Andrea Joyce Heimer classifies her work as “outsider art”, or paintings of strange suburbia. Her solo exhibition at the Good Luck Gallery in Los Angeles, “Suburban Mythology: Volume 2″, is a continuation of her main theme: every day dramas full of dark humor, based on real people and events in Heimer’s life. Her simple and flat visual style recalls artists like Mark Whalen, Mel Kadel, or Deedee Cheriel, but this can be mis-leading. Heimer fills her scenes with personal symbolism.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

For their third anniversary, Arch Enemy Arts in Philadelphia decided to celebrate with three simultaneous exhibitions: a group show, a customization show, and a print show. The centerpiece of this trifecta is “Imaginary Menagerie: The Arch Enemy Arts Guide to Cryptozoology Vol. 1.” As the long-winded title suggests, Arch Enemy Arts invited a large group of artists to create works based on their chosen mythical beasts. For many of the artists in the show — like Erika Sanada (HF Vol. 31), Naoto Hattori (HF Vol. 35), and Caitlin Hackett (HF Vol. 17) — this theme is already their specialty. “Imaginary Menagerie” opens on April 3, as well as the other two shows, “Stacked” and “Full Bleed.”

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Based in Mexico City, Curiot (featured in HF Vol. 29) creates phantasmagoric paintings where deity-like monsters traverse the clouds. The silhouettes of tiny people floating in their wake reveal that human beings look like mere playthings in comparison. Last weekend, Curiot debuted his latest solo show, “Down the Rabbit Hole with Neon Lights,” at San Francisco’s FFDG, as well as a downtown mural curated by Fifty24SF, another local gallery. According to FFDG, the new paintings in Curiot’s exhibition allude to the rapid pace of technology and the consequential environmental pollution. His creatures travel through a mysterious continuum to attempt to reach the “vortex of souls,” only to get sucked into the past where they must confront their previous wrongdoing.

by Annie OwensPosted on

Robert Williams signed books all day long for an endless line of fans on March 28 at the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery. His new book, SLANG Aesthetics!, serves as an exhibition guide to the comprehensive retrospective by the same name. The exhibit opened last February at the same venue where the signing took place. It’s on view through April 19 in tandem with Juxtapoz Magazine’s anniversary group show, “20 Years Under the Influence of Juxtapoz.” SLANG Aesthetics! covers Williams’ expansive career as an artist, a founder of Juxtapoz, and arguably the godfather of low brow art and culture.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

While many cultures across the world have historically acknowledged the existence of more than two genders, our society is slowly coming to view gender as a spectrum rather than a binary. With the trans movement gaining visibility and Facebook offering users over 50 gender identity options to choose from for their profiles, it’s a ripe opportunity to have discussions about what gender identities, roles, and stereotypes truly mean. In this spirit, Rehs Contemporary in New York is preparing for their group show “Sexes,” opening April 18.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

On April 11, Dorothy Circus Gallery in Rome will present “Nocturnalia” by Italian artist Seven Moods and “Head in The Clouds” by Swiss artist Zoe Byland, two side-by-side solo shows with overlapping themes. Both artists use primarily monochromatic palettes to create paintings with a sense of mystery and suspense — sometimes even foreboding. Byland’s paintings riff on 19th-century family photographs. Without any adults in sight, the little girls posing gracefully in her work are privy to magical apparitions and strange happenings. Viewers are left to wonder whether these supernatural occurrences are the product of the characters’ imaginations, or perhaps ghostly visitors caught on camera.