by James ScarboroughPosted on

Liu Guangguang was born in China’s Gansu province. He attended Lu Xun Academy of Fine Art. He lives and works in Shenyang and Beijing. He’s a member of the Beijing-based EDGE Creative Collective. His recent work is about scale. His figures (and animals) go about their normal activity. They check their phones. They play cards. They get ready for bed. The people smile without a care in the world. Despite the normalcy of each image, something’s unusual, if not wrong. Either the figures have miniature heads or else their bodies are gigantic. Their fingers and necks are elongated. A few have huge eyes. One woman has the floppy ears and trunk of an elephant.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Technicolor maven Maya Hayuk recently opened her solo show “Alles Klar” at Die Kunstagentin in Cologne, Germany. Sparsely hung on the gallery’s white, painted-brick walls, the painter and muralist’s neon creations have room to breath without overwhelming the viewer. After all, Hayuk almost solely uses neon hues, often overlapping them in kaleidoscopic patterns that subtly evoke folk art forms such as weaving. Each piece attracts the eye like a nexus of energy — as if Hayuk’s intense color choices have a sort of gravitational pull. On a mural created at the entrance of the gallery, Hayuk turns up the volume, subsuming a corner of the space in refracted rainbows.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Hot off a mural tour that took him to Philadelphia, Chicago and New York, Shepard Fairey recently traveled to Berlin for to create a new street piece for Urban Nation’s “One Wall” project. The arts platform is behind the interdisciplinary Project M (see our coverage here and here) and recently invited Fairey, Dutch collage artist Handiedan and Irish muralists Icy & Sot to create large-scale wall works. In his typical propaganda fashion, Fairey’s mural champions creative freedom with the slogan “Make Art Not War.” Read our recent interview with Fairey here and take a look at some photos of the piece by Henrik Haven below.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

A notorious former prison off of San Francisco’s coast will be the site of Ai Weiwei’s latest exhibition, “@Large: Ai Weiwei on Alcatraz,” opening September 27. The renowned Chinese artist — who has served time behind bars in his native country for the politically outspoken content of his work — has been working remotely on the site-specific project in a transcontinental collaboration between Beijing and San Francisco with curator Cheryl Haines. Because Ai Weiwei is currently on house arrest for tax evasion in Beijing, the project took three years of planning and nine months of making with the help of many volunteers. He will personally never see the work.

by Sasha BogojevPosted on

September 11 through 13, London hosted the MyFinBec pop-up show, introducing a unique project that merged urban art and wine making. After their initial show at the Cave Fin Bec winery in Sion, Switzerland, and Cologne, Germany, the exhibition was presented at LimeWharf to London’s local art and wine lovers. Once a year, this winery commissions well-established and emerging artists to create labels for their limited edition organic wines through the MyFineBec project. For 2014, the winery introduced a line-up of internationally-recognized artists: Vhils from Portugal, Herakut from Germany, C215 from France and Etam Cru (featured in our current issue, Hi-Fructose Vol. 32) from Poland. The artists were invited to create mural-like works on stacks of wine cases that were later available for sale.

by CaroPosted on

In 1979, Andy Warhol conceived “Shadows” with a goal that would not be realized. Vibrant with the high energy of a 70s disco, the 102-piece painting was designed to wrap around Studio 54, but it never did. Yes, painting, singular. Although in multiple parts, Warhol’s design is a visual décor meant to be shown as a whole. It has not been displayed in it’s entirety quite like this until today, now on view at the MOCA Los Angeles.