by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Mike Lee draws neat, compact worlds populated by rotund homunculi. Simplified like Lego characters, his small protagonists navigate their urban landscape, which appears so conspicuously tidy that it resembles a toy replica more so than an actual city. Lee’s drawings are small-scale; he utilizes negative space to make viewers zero in on specific scenes. We look into his minuscule world from an aerial view, like a child playing with a doll house or a deity looking down at the unsuspecting mortals on Earth. With his painstaking graphite work, Lee renders the humdrum of the day-to-day with novelty and humor.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Madiha Siraj creates intensely colorful installations that overstimulate the senses. Through the accumulation of cheap, commonplace materials, her works become veritable visual spectacles. “Oyster EB-124,” for instance, invited viewers to enter a room lined floor-to-ceiling with rainbow paint swatches that form pixelated-looking patterns. The patterns become disrupted at certain points in the room where the paint swatches’ shapes lose their regularity.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

French artist Aurel Rubbish creates ornate paper-cut works in which figures seem to flourish from baroque decorative motifs. The combination of black paper, gold leaf embellishments, and white negative space creates high-contrast, graphic visuals that immediately grab viewers’ attention. There seem to be endless details to discover as the eye moves through the minuscule geometric patters he renders with his blade. The artist just wrapped up his solo show, “New Romantic,” at MathGoth Gallery in Paris. Take a look at his latest works here.

by CaroPosted on

On view as of yesterday, Galerie Perrotin is exhibiting Japanese artist Makoto Aida’s first major exhibition in Hong Kong. The show presents some of his most well-known artwork, in addition to experimental new pieces with the loose theme of metamorphosis. There are different interpretations of the world’s changes in recent years, from politics to global warming. At the center of it all is his new sculpture “Space Tripper 1455″ (lovingly called “Comet-chan”). See more after the jump!

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

In Norwegian artist Per Kristian Nygård’s most recent installation, “Not Red But Green,” a lush, hilly lawn spilled out of NoPlace in Oslo. Its manicured grass resembled a scene from a well-kept park, not a gallery, effectively conflating the boundaries between indoors and outdoors. Nygård’s work is conceptual and cryptic. He describes the inspiration for “Not Red But Green” coming from a fever dream he experienced during a bout of the flu. In his vision, he discovered a lump on his body and imagined himself traversing a crater of flesh and a forest of hair. The hills in the installation came from this personal nightmare, but regardless of their backstory, they create a disorienting viewing experience that asks one to question the ways we commodify natural phenomena for human consumption.