by CaroPosted on

Minnesota based artist Alex Kuno best describes his work’s narratives as apocalyptic, satiric fairytales. His mixed media illustrations are as dark as they are whimsical, following deranged subjects, often children, rendered in acrylics, graphite, chalk, ink, ballpoint pens and crayons on pine boards. His early series, after which he named his website, calls this world the “The Miscreants of Tiny Town”, inhabited by lost orphans looking for a home in an endless, foreboding landscape that has as much personality as its characters. Though nightmarish, there’s also a sense of romance in his young subjects’ undying desire to eke out a better existence for themselves. A story about romance is at the heart of Kuno’s latest series debuting on Valentine’s Day at Dorothy Circus Gallery in Rome.

by CaroPosted on

Italian artist Agostino Arrivabene paints an iconographic universe that exists somewhere at the division between the real world from the spiritual realm. Previously featured here on our blog, his works include landscapes, portraits, and large paintings allegorical and apocalyptic in nature. Subjects of his paintings often appear as if from another time and place, celestial bodies and nudes emerging from the earth that recall the figures of those who influence him, particularly Gustave Moreau and Odd Nerdrum. Arrivabene describes his personal world as one that is eclectic and occult, where his artistic lanuage changes depending on his life experience. His upcoming solo exhibition at Cara Gallery in New York, “Hierogamy”, delves into mythological themes and ideas about personal intimacy, change, and time.

by CaroPosted on

A sculptor based in Coruña, Spain seems to be defying the laws of nature with his amazing malleable stone sculptures. His name is José Manuel Castro López’s and his works are actually a trick of the eye. They are made out of natural materials like granite and iron oxide, from which he crafts his rock-like formations with folds, wrinkles and flaps as if they were made of clay or skin, as in his “Faces” series where smiling and grimacing human faces are carved out of the solid material. Providing some of the stones’ fleshy appearance, one could say they almost appear to be alive.

by Kirsten AndersonPosted on

Amsterdam based artist Danny Van Ryswyk has been getting a fair amount of attention here on Hi-Fructose lately, but when I recently told the editors of HF that I would be traveling to the Netherlands to visit Danny (Full disclosure: Danny is exhibiting at my gallery Roq La Rue) they took me up on my offer of turning my visit into a “studio visit” post for the blog. So, without further ado, let’s take a little closer look at Danny’s upcoming work, his studio process, and what makes his work transcend the typical 3D sculpture formula.

by CaroPosted on

New Zealand based artist Meredith Marsone’s muted oil portraits reveal glimpses of her subjects in emotional and peaceful moments, “sparks” of realism amidst abstraction. They are typically painted with realistic details juxtaposed against areas of impasto, paint applied thickly enough that the brush or painting-knife strokes are visible. It’s a technique that she admits was borne out of frustration and is an artistically risky one, a process that she details at her Youtube channel and blog, where she recently wrote, “I think the best work I’ve made has been about things that are meaningful to me personally and have been about something I’ve had experience in.”

by CaroPosted on

There may be no such thing as a magic carpet, but Argentine artist Alexandra Kehayoglou’s distinctive carpet designs will instantly transport you to another place. Her imaginative works have been described as romantic and fairytale-like woven playgrounds, imitating textures of nature like moss, sand, water, tree bark and grassy pastures, as in her “Pastureland” and “Garden” series. Kehayoglou sources her materials from the leftover scraps from her family’s carpet factory in Buenos Aires, shown here in this short video documentary about her work. One of Kehayoglou’s latest projects, titled “En los pies de Elpiniki” (At the foot of Elpiniki) is a giant, elaborately woven shoe that fantasizes about the beginnings of her family’s tradition of making carpets.