by Andy SmithPosted on

Ian Cumberland’s surreal, solitary scenes have evolved and progressed into even stranger territory, with his figures disappearing into reflective holes and taking part in bleak internalization. The Irish painter uses oils primarily, but in recent works, integrates materials like carpeting and mirrors. Cumberland was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The artist-centric Hi Fructose x Daylight Curfew Collection is back with a new shirt design from Robert Bowen. Available as both a T-shirt and a hoodie, the Bowen design carries a familiar type of imagery for fans of the artist: a mechanized insect, climbing over a design-exclusive take on the Hi-Fructose logo. Order the new shirt here. Past designs for this collection come from artists Brandi Milne and Martin Ontiveros.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Krista Perry

Siblings Sid and Marty Krofft were the architects of television shows and surreal puppetry that inspired generations, garnering the biggest influence in the 1960s and ’70s with designs for “Hanna-Barbera’s Banana Splits” and “H.R. Pufnstuf.” Now, La La Land Gallery curator Kii Arens has assembled a group show to pay tribute. The Krofft Super Art Show opens on Aug. 26 at the Los Angeles gallery.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Brandi Milne’s pop-surrealist, acrylic paintings are both sweet and strange, each a peek into the artist’s modern-day and childhood influences. A new body of work “Once Upon a Quiet Kingdom,” is collected in a show at Corey Helford Gallery in Los Angeles, which kicked off on Saturday. This is her fourth solo exhibition.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Christopher Konecki’s vibrant paintings, sculptures, and murals distort and create surreal artifacts out of urban landscapes. This vibrant, yet somewhat bleak observations recall work from Jeff Gillette and Masakatsu Sashie. (Also, Josh Keyes, who was recently featured here on the blog, carried similar visual themes in his own early work.)

by Andy SmithPosted on

Janaina Mello Landini’s work may appear as representations of the circulatory system of the human body or roots from the natural world. But in truth, Landini’s work is created from unbraided rope, meticulously twisted and arranged and emblematic of a number of concepts. Zipper Galeria says that she combines her knowledge of “architecture, physics and mathematics” to creature each work.