by Andy SmithPosted on

Rendered just in black inks, Pony Reinhardt’s are riveting tethers to the natural world. The tattoo artist and owner of Portland’s Tenderfoot Studios describes herself as “an astral ruffian, thriving in the wilderness of the lost and found nebulae and dripping carbon monoxide” and her “art is a cosmic cataclysm of the Ghastly Phantastic.” That celestial quality does carry through to the recent works shown below.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Gregory Ferrand’s cinematic paintings, often laced with anachronisms, speak to a broader sense of isolation belonging to an otherwise social species. The artist’s academic background in film is evident throughout his works, with a full-frame attention to mood and detail. Among the artist’s other influences: Mexican muralists, comic books, and quite evident below, a mid-19th-century aesthetic.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Keiichi Tanaami’s wild sculptures and mixed-media works currently inhabit Jeffrey Deitch’s New York location, as an extension of its “Tokyo Pop Underground” group show. The Hi-Fructose Vol. 38 cover artist is featured at the space until Nov. 2. We last mentioned Tanaami on our site here, in a story on his collaboration with artist Oliver Payne.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Nina Bunjevac’s masterful stippled drawings have appeared as single works, portraiture, comic books, tarot cards, commercial illustration, and other forms. All showcase the Canada-born artist’s command of shadows and subtlety, with the ability to move between the macabre and the humorous within a single frame. Earlier this year, she released her latest graphic novel, “Bezimena,” a re-imagining of the myth of Artemis and Siproites.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Super Future Kid’s candy-colored paintings and sculptures fill Gallery Poulsen later this month with her new show, “Smells Like Teenage Armpit.” The artist says that all of the dimension-hopping paintings, crafted in acrylics and spraypaint, “started out as ideas I had just before falling asleep in my bed.” The show kicks off on Oct. 26 and runs through Nov. 16.

by Andy SmithPosted on

With “Bone Pendulum in Motley” at Freight+Volume Gallery, Johnston Foster offers new, wild assemblages made from metal hardware, textiles and plastics, PVC, yoga mats, electrical wires, and other materials typically reserved for home renovation projects. Kicking off tomorrow and running through Nov. 10 at the gallery, several new pieces are included in the show.