by Sasha BogojevPosted on

The hardworking team behind one of the world’s longest lasting street art festivals, Nuart in Norway, covered here over the years, recently announced the launch of yet another public art project. Nuart Sandnes Art Trail is Norway’s first official Street Art Trail, and its main goal is to connect Sandnes’ urban center with the city’s surrounding rural areas.

by Clara MoraesPosted on

The playful and humorous Dutch artist Parra plunges into a feminine universe for his new solo show at Ruttkowski; 68 gallery in Cologne, Germany. His exhibit “I can’t look at your face anymore” features a new collection of multimedia work, which includes paintings, sculpture and textiles. Parra is well-known for his provocative pieces, featured here, paintings with vivid colors and minimalist style filled with surreal creatures, many of them women.

by CaroPosted on

Nicki Crock is a conceptual artist currently working in Columbus, Ohio, but her head is in the clouds. Her installation series “Dream House” transforms space into an ethereal, geometric floating dreamscape made out of white paper. “A dream house is something to aspire to and long for,” she says. “What better form could a daydream take shape in, than with something that we, as humans, already use to fulfill our imaginations: clouds.”

by CaroPosted on

Oregon based artist Morgan Rosskopf describes herself as a “visual hunter-gatherer”. In other words, her surreal, carnal works are mostly driven by her own intuitions. Her illustrations on paper combine hand-drawn elements and collage to create lush clusters of personal imagery: a messy, knotted assemblage of fragments, from the sweet and savory to bodily and grotesque. “Hunting and gathering images is both subject and method,” she explains. “I believe that all my images already exist; I just have to find them and rearrange them.”

by CaroPosted on

San Francisco based artist Jeremy Mann captures the exciting air of his hometown in his dynamic oil landscapes. His “Cityscapes” series portrays the city from bustling, bird’s-eye views to its more mundane and quiet street corners at night, all flickering with glitchy dabs of paint that makes his art appear digital, though it is a description he rejects. It’s a common misconception that perhaps stems from his process, where he references “jumbled up” digital manipulations of his own photographs.

by CaroPosted on

Patti Warashina is a Pacific Northwest based artist known for her imaginative ceramic sculptures that are full of wit and sarcasm. At age 76, she does not stop inventing. Featured here on our blog, her clay figures are usually placed in fantasy environments, where she uses sculpture to explore such themes as the human condition, feminism, car-culture, and political and social topics.