by CaroPosted on

The selfie is the self-portrait of the digital age that is changing the way we see and think about ourselves and eachother. But what happens when we remove our faces from our photos? How would we look without our heads? Ibiza, Spain based designer Giuseppe Pepe presents us with this same question in his series of photo manipulations titled “Loosing My Mind”. He describes it as a project of “anti-beauty,” going against our intrinsic desire to present our most beautiful self to the world.

by CaroPosted on

Pennsylvania based artist Dorian Vallejo paints the realm of our subconscious as a dreamworld of floating figures, forests and natural motifs. Though his subject matter and style has evolved and shifted between Hyperealism and Surrealism, one element remains the same and that is his interest in feminine beauty, and the beauty of life as a whole. “Most of my work centers around an interest in psychology, philosophy and how we process ideas,” the artist explained in an email to Hi-Fructose. “I’m also interested in pop culture, the modern existence, and what I see as the poetry of life. I alter my approach depending on how I’m engaging ideas.”

by CaroPosted on

Brookyln based artist Marcel Dzama, featured here on our blog, is well known for intricate dioramas and large scale polyptychs that draw from his talents across a range of media. Dzama works in multiple disciplines to bring his cast of human figures, animals, and imaginary hybrids to life, and has developed an international reputation and following for his art that depicts fanciful, anachronistic worlds. Following their highly acclaimed installations by FAILE, JR, and Dustin Yellin, New York City Ballet has chosen Dzama as their next collaborator for their 2016 series.

by CaroPosted on

Canadian artist Alex Garant’s “double-eyed” portraits, featured here on our blog, have become instantly recognizable for the dizzying effect they create. Her style of overlaying her subject’s features like eyes and lips produces multiple images that are captivating but admittedly, also challenging to look at; for some, her works create phantom images, and even the feeling of being intoxicated. Her new series of portraits, titled “Wakefulness”, is inspired by how our brains enter into a state of consciousness when we wake up.

by CaroPosted on

Tokyo based collective known as teamLab describe themselves as “ultra-technologists”, artists who seek to merge art, technology and design in their work, designed to allow viewers to have a more personal and unique connection with art. With Japanese designer Toshiyuki Inoko at the helm, the collective’s installations are nothing short of magical- featured here on our blog, they are a spontaneous experience where artworks come to “life” as animation when approached by visitors. The secret to the magic behind their work is motion sensors that pick up the viewer’s movements, prompting paintings of the natural world to become a blooming and wilting garden of delights. Pace Art + Technology in Silicon Valley, California, seeking to create an environment that encourages educational play, invited teamLab to join their Future Park series- the result of which is “Living Digital Space and Future Parks” opening on February 6th.

by CaroPosted on

Brooklyn based artist Jonathan Viner pursues dreamlike visions that blend the design aesthetic of the time he grew up in, the 1970s, with cool tones and pops of bright colors. First featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 34, and on our blog, one of the strengths of Viner’s oil paintings lies in their stylish look, using elements of the era’s sex appeal, trendy accents, kitsch and fashion, to pump up their nostalgia and intrigue. In his upcoming exhibition “Strange Math” at Roq La Rue Gallery in Seattle, Viner offers a cinematic narrative in a series of new allegorical paintings.