by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

While most of us crumple our dryer lint into a neat ball to throw away before the next load, Tonya Corkey collects and separates the pesky, dusty substance by color to use in her dryer lint portraits on canvas. Corkey’s current body of work, “See You in the Future,” takes its inspiration from found vintage photographs of anonymous people. Corkey distorts each face in her representation, layering different perspectives to acknowledge the passing of time. The resourceful artist weaves the lint through the canvas, creating textured works that lie somewhere between embroidery, painting and sculpture.

by CaroPosted on

The work of Taiwanese photographer Yung Cheng Lin (aka “3cm”) is a sensitive and surreal observation of the female condition. Sexuality, menstruation, maturity and birth are all running themes in his photos, an ongoing larger body of work. His critics take two sides; most praise his abstract, personal take on a woman’s experience while others rejects it as objectification. 3cm rarely, if ever, grants interviews or interpretations of his work, so we can’t defend either. He wants his audience to look at his photos without interference. Take a look at 3cm’s latest work after the jump.

by Hi-Fructose StaffPosted on

Did you know that you can follow Hi-Fructose on all your favorite social networks? We’re constantly sharing our contemporary art discoveries through Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram and Pinterest. Plus, check out our YouTube channel for exclusive video interviews and profiles featuring the likes of Scott Hove, Rob Sato, Wayne White, Jennybird Alcantara and more. On our social media, you’ll get updates in realtime so you never miss out on the latest in contemporary art, including updates from festivals and events. Want more art in your feed? Make sure you hit that follow button!

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Those who have been to a drag club (or caught an episode of RuPaul’s Drag Race) know that campiness and kitsch are staples of drag culture. By inverting the gender stereotypes and taking them to the extreme, queens mock the conventions of gender and the consumer society that enforces them. Peter Shmelzer takes cues from this type of satirical play with his over-the-top paintings, where gender boundaries are broken and erotic acts become contorted into bizarre, uncomfortable displays.

by CaroPosted on

You may know Doc Hammer for his work as co-creator of Adult Swim’s The Venture Bros. He’s also an accomplished New York based painter, influenced by 19th century classical art. At that time, Symbolism was popular in Europe as an intellectual style of painting with gothic components. Hammer’s “Saints” series, which shares a similar aesthetic, will exhibit August 2nd at Century Guild gallery in Culver City. It is his ongoing series of oil paintings that portrays modern, dark haired women with a streak of antiquity. There is an anger and sadness to his work, a visceral feeling, with careful studies of Caravaggio-like light on the sitter’s skin and bra. See more after the jump.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Turkish artist Merve Morkoç aka Lakormis mocks our predilection for beauty with portraits that toy with our instincts and desires. Thin, young, model-like characters with the types of faces and bodies that line the pages of fashion magazines are her primary subjects. But Morkoç alters the women’s appearances with disturbing, fantasy disfigurations that make them the stuff of nightmares. Initial attraction quickly becomes repulsion. Morkoç waves the illusion of beauty before the viewer’s face and rips it away like a veil, revealing the strange, Frankenstein-esque details she has added to her characters.