by Nathan SpoorPosted on

Ever the astute aesthete, Esao Andrews (previously covered in HF Vol. 8 and online) brings a renewed sense of clarity and purpose to his latest body of work. His new paintings will be featured at NYC’s Jonathan LeVine Gallery from October 11 through November 8 for Andrews’s upcoming solo show, “Epilogues.” For this series, the artist embraced some of his signature motifs, bringing them back into the studio and furthering their growth. The ongoing narrative in his work, as Andrews tells us, needed a conclusion, a way to say farewell and move forward with his pursuits. This exhibition of painting provides him with just that: closure. In “Epilogues,” we are treated to a visual feast of some of Andrews’s most well-known images as they would appear as aged, matured and weathered in his trademark tonality, creating transcendent moments of haunted familiarity.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

While one may look at Gabriel Dawe’s installations and call them fantastical and even decorative, the artist considers working with thread an act of rebellion. Growing up in Mexico City, as a boy, the Texas-based artist was discouraged from taking an interest in embroidery. While thread is his preferred medium, he uses it for architectural means. His minimalist aesthetic departs greatly from traditional crafting. Instead, Dawe uses the thread to build translucent, colorful shapes that alter the spaces they inhabit. He calls them Plexuses, a term used to describe branching vessels or nerves. Dawe recently set up Plexus 28, a rich eggplant and crimson-hued piece composed of two concentric circles, at the Virginia MOCA. The MOCA created a time lapse video of the creation of the piece, as well as a short video interview with the artist. Check out more on Plexus 28 below and if you’re curious about Dawe’s other work, take a look at our previous post about the artist here.

by CaroPosted on

When we first heard from Spanish artist David de la Mano, he was just wrapping up a mural at Djerbahood Street Art festival, one of the world’s largest. Since then, he’s been to Madrid, Cardiff, and Wales- home to his latest mural with Sheffield based muralist and artist Phlegm. He has also painted murals in Montevideo (Uruguay), Sadnes and Stavanger (Norway), Buenos Aires (Argentina), Lima (Peru) and Florida, just to name a few. De la Mano doesn’t consider himself a “street artist”- he’s first and foremost an illustrator with work in the street. In his own words, he’s an “explorer of human behavior”, represented in masses of people, their conflicts, and visual contradictions.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Hazy figures walk towards the viewer in John Wentz’s new series of oil paintings, their faces muddled as if conjured from some distant memory or last night’s dream. His solo show “Passages,” opening alongside Mike Davis’s “A Blind Man’s Journey” (see our recent studio visit with Davis here), is set to debut at San Francisco’s 111 Minna Gallery on October 3. Wentz’s work is optimally experienced in person. Playing with new textures, he steers his figurative paintings further into abstract territory, breaking down bodies into their basic components and exaggerating the ways light dances on them. Wentz deliberately calls attention to the paint itself, allowing pigments to bubble and burst and scraping away fine lines with a pencil. The results are disorienting and poignant, reminding us of the ways our own memories can be distorted and altered.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Dutch painter Chris Berens’s work (featured in our book Hi-Fructose Collected 3) can be described as storybook-like with a darker twist. His light, airy paintings have a luminescence about them, as if his figures and the spaces they inhabit have a crystalline translucency that imbues them a magical-feeling ambiance. Berens recently collaborated with best-selling young adult fiction author Kami Garcia on an illustration project. An artist herself, Garcia is a long-time admirer of Berens and asked him to create three new paintings to be reprinted in her forthcoming novel, Unmarked. We bring you a first look at these new pieces before they debut in the book, which hits stores later this week.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Carl Krull’s drawings have a visceral appeal. Each of his works is composed of horizontal lines that start out parallel and wrinkle somewhere in the middle, yielding figures as if out of some primordial mass. Sometimes the forms he draws are hardly distinguishable from one other. The eye attempts to untangle his orgiastic cacophony of limbs and biomorphic shapes as if they were some strange riddle. On September 27, Krull debuted his solo show “Seismic” at V1 Gallery in Copenhagen. The pieces evoke both the smooth grooves of cliff sides and the monochromatic markings of seismographs. By setting restrictions on his process (he seems to refuse to take the charcoal off the paper until it has crossed from one side to the other), Krull captures the quality of geological formations and invokes themes of creation and mythology.