by CaroPosted on

In 1979, Andy Warhol conceived “Shadows” with a goal that would not be realized. Vibrant with the high energy of a 70s disco, the 102-piece painting was designed to wrap around Studio 54, but it never did. Yes, painting, singular. Although in multiple parts, Warhol’s design is a visual décor meant to be shown as a whole. It has not been displayed in it’s entirety quite like this until today, now on view at the MOCA Los Angeles.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Kehinde Wiley’s (Hi-Fructose Vol. 29) opulent portraiture subtly stirs the status quo. As an American artist, Wiley honed his craft in accordance with a legacy of Euro-centric art history that left him simultaneously awed and alienated. One would be hard-pressed to find a grandiose portrait of a person of color in the works of the Renaissance masters in the Met or the Louvre. This is the motivating factor of Wiley’s oeuvre: to elevate images of average people of African descent through his ornate depictions, exposing the singular beauty of his subjects through dramatic compositions that evoke the Baroque period.

by Hi-Fructose StaffPosted on

What a special gift for someone special, including yourself! This brooch features Mark Ryden’s “Daisy” drawing from “The Gay 90s: West” exhibition (see our coverage here) and is now available in the Hi-Fructose online store. The brooch features a mineral crystal dome and a solid metal back custom stamped with Mark’s logo and a safety pin style attachment. It comes in a black velvet pouch and box with a certificate of authenticity. Check it out in our shop.

by Nathan SpoorPosted on

Kyle Thompson is a young photographer on the rise. He began shooting at age 19 in his hometown of Chicago, Illinois, and in the last couple years has amassed a substantial body of work that shows a surprisingly adept and concise voice for such a young artist. This work, just released in a book titled Somewhere Else is comprised mostly of self-portraits taken in various abandoned locations found while on a road trip traveling the country.

by CaroPosted on

As an artist whose illustrations have natural fluidity, it’s no wonder that Kelly Vivanco found herself painting water in “Peculiar Tides”. Her latest solo at Thinkspace gallery has a water theme, an element that has captured our imagination for centuries. Water is a source of life and vitality, doomed disasters, bold adventure stories and some of the world’s most curious mysteries. Telling its story is an undertaking felt by Vivanco’s roughly 40 paintings created over 8 months, sculptures, and a narrative starring childlike heroines that vaguely resemble the artist.

by CaroPosted on

Coinciding with the opening of “BLAB!” at Copro Gallery last Saturday was Yoko d’Holbachie’s “Genesis of Girls”. Over the course of her career, featured in Vol. 6 in 2007, d’Holbachie has created candy colored paintings inspired by the stories of time. One of her greatest inspirations is traditional Japanese folklore and legends. Her characters are non-human and androgynous with a feminine touch, found in her symbols of butterflies and birds representing fertility. Her latest solo show is a reimagining and exploration of the origin of girls from various cultures.