by Margot BuermannPosted on


Eguchi Ayane is a Japanese artist whose oil paintings transport the viewer to candy-colored fantasy lands. Yet within these whimsical worlds, startling scenarios unfold. Juxtaposing ‘cutesy’ images of teddy bears, bow ties and charming creatures with the darker undercurrent of her narratives, the artist expresses the duality of not only her world, but ours as well. Find more of her work on Twitter.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Marlène Mocquet is a French artist whose chimerical paintings and sculptures portray strange worlds full of quirky, animated characters. Her surreal creations often have a sense of childlike whimsy and humor; other times, they turn dark and tumultuous, and verging on grotesque.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Australian artist Kate Shaw combines “paint pours”, collage, glitters and inks to render psychedelic landscapes. The colorful images yield awe-inspiring effects, yet are accompanied with a dark undertone. While they may capture the “transcendent beauty” of nature, at the same time they hint at the troubling environmental changes brought on by human activity.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Zolloc is the moniker of Austin-bred, New York City-based artist/animator Hayden Zezula. When HiFructose.com last checked in with the Tumblr-lauded phenom, we called his gray-toned, mutant baby-filled GIFs “chill-inducing.” Many of the GIFs in this piece take on a more abstract form, vague structures that bubble and evolve. There’s still an organic aspect to those creations, and somehow, the artist’s work maintains its ability to be both absorbing and inspire uneasiness.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Artist Emma Hopkins describes her work as painting “people from the inside out.” This idea seems to work on both physical and emotional levels, as her arresting portraits and meditations are teeming with vulnerability. Her subjects are often unclothed, and even when she focuses on isolated body parts or strips off their skin, humanity is present.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Amy Hill – “Apathy”

New York-based artist Amy Hill puts her contemporary spin on the work of 15th century painter Hans Memling in her series of oil paintings titled Seven Deadly Sins. Hill is known for adapting the styles of early Dutch and Flemish Renaissance painting and placing historical subjects within modern day settings. On her website, the artist writes, “I chose these eras because of my stylistic kinship with their artists, which allows me to carry on a kind of dialogue with them… I have chosen portraiture as it is a genre that runs through art history and allows me through poses, gestures and fashion detail to make social, psychological and anthropological statements about my subjects.”