by Andy SmithPosted on

Photographer Karen Jerzyk creates surreal works that use often overlooked spaces and themes of both horror and the fantastic. Despite what seems like a complex narrative in each piece, the artist insists that each photo is open to interpretation. She simply aims to invoke “thought and emotion.”

by Andy SmithPosted on


Hi-Fructose co-founder Annie Owens assembles a new body of work in “A Place Worth Knowing,” a new show at La Luz De Jesus Gallery in Los Angeles. The title of this collection of watercolor works comes from Algernon Blackwood, a favorite author of the artist: “No place worth knowing yields itself at sight, and those the least inviting on first view may leave the most haunting pictures upon the walls of memory.” In her statement, Owens offers some insight on the figures found across her pieces. The show kicks off Aug. 4 and runs through Aug. 28.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Mathieu Connery, the alias of Frederic Chabot, creates ground paintings across Canada that uses geometric forms and the natural textures of the space to create illusions. This vibrant works began as a project at the Montréal MURAL Festival on Boulevard Saint-Laurent. Connery’s been creating murals on walls for years, but has just recently become known specifically for his talents displayed on sidewalks, streets, and other walkable surfaces.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Swiss artist Till Rabus crafts realistic oil paintings that exhibit both a whimsical and darker side to nostalgia. His version of a “Transformer” may consist of household objects, and his combined Disney dolls hint at the toll time takes on the icons of youth. The artist’s striking style may make viewers mistake the works for manipulated photographs, at first glance.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Recently, the Captain Boomer Collective delivered an unexpected object just steps away from the Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris: a beached whale. Well, it’s actually a fiberglass statue, though anyone approaching the accompanying “scientists,” life-like stench, and mass of the creature is in for an experience much like the real-life occurrence. The point is to offer both mystery and hint at the real-world problems of humans’ destruction of natural ecosystems.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Calgary-born, Los Angeles-based artist/graphic designer Geoff McFetridge deconstructs everyday images and reimagines them in simpler, yet captivating studies. He uses elements of logo design and commercial inspiration to create these acrylic paintings. McFetridge was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.