by CaroPosted on

San Francisco based artist Joe Hengst presents his idea of the future world in imaginative, acrylic landscape paintings. At the core of his work is his belief in man’s increasing separation from the natural world. Since the beginning of our time, nature has supplied us with the things we need most for survival, such as food, water, clothing, and shelter. With the introduction of modern day society came a change in how we supply our every day needs. Hengst represents our withdrawal from nature by painting ethereal pieces that experiments with abstraction.

by CaroPosted on

Jennybird Alcantara (HF Vol. 14 featured artist) has been working on a magical new series of oil paintings inspired by all things unknown. She will reveal them on June 14th at AFA Gallery in Soho, New York in her solo exhibition titled, “Charming the Wilds”. At her blog, Jennybird writes, “To have the ability to “Charm” takes a different kind of power, it is still strong but soft and alluring at the same time, it ‘conjures’ images of hypnotized ladies being led through the woods by beasts or the ability to charm the fairy voice out of a flower and bring it to a new level of life, the ability to communicate with animals, it also can feel mischievous but not too dark.”

by CaroPosted on

Italian artist Carlo Fantin (featured here) uses the Catholic imagery from his devout upbringing as a metaphor for contemporary rituals. In particular, his hand-cut paper works address our unrelenting use of social media, where he likens bloggers and the media to shepherds whom we follow like a flock of sheep. His current exhibition, “U Have 2 Name Him Jesus #Annunciation” at Mercury 20 in Oakland, CA continues this play on religious iconography.

by CaroPosted on

German artists Jasmin Siddiqui and Falk Lehmann, aka “Herakut,” (covered here) have traveled all over the world to paint murals and exhibit their drippy, figurative paintings. Through recent social projects, they’ve shared experiences which have provided the inspiration for their current exhibition, “Displaced Thoughts”. On view at the studio and work space of Urban Nation, the exhibition paints a picture of “displaced” individuals due to persecution, conflict, and human rights violations. Herakut sheds a light on these people and the organizations designed to help them in the Middle East, Europe and Africa with new paintings, photographs and installations.

by CaroPosted on

The shape of a church is indefinitely sketched into the landscape in the latest project by architecture duo, Gijs Van Vaerenbergh. Comprised of Belgian architects Pieterjan Gijs and Arnout Van Vaerenbergh, their series of see-through churches, “Reading Between the Lines,” are not intended to be functional as shelter. They are more like sculptures that borrow design inspiration from local churches’ architecture in the area. See more after the jump!

by CaroPosted on

“An ancient mosaic looks exactly as intended by the artist who produced it over two millennia ago. What else can claim that kind of staying power? I find this idea simply amazing,” says street artist Jim Bachor. Bachor’s current series “Treats in the Streets” fills potholes in his home town of Chicago with playful mosaics of icecream and popsicles. Using the same materials as ancient craftsmen, they are made with thousands of colorful pieces of glass and marble set in mortar which protects each piece. The icecreams are part of an ongoing project where the artist takes pothole suggestions from his fans online, and then fills them with images of things like fish, candy, cereal, french fries, and words like “pothole.”