by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

The people in Carl Beazley’s portraits seem to be fighting internal battles to hold back their grimaces and make straight faces. His oil paintings feature young people wearing multiple expressions at once. Several small faces inhabit their full-sized heads, each one sending a conflicting signal. Some of Beazley’s portraits look like a time lapse of a single gesture, while others are meant to confuse and amuse viewers with their incongruities.

by CaroPosted on

Merry Karnowsky set the mood of the holiday season with their year-end exhibition, “Praeteritum Nunc Futurum” on Saturday. Outside, the weather was crisp and colored lights lit the window, while inside the gallery offered a preview of shows to come. Although wide open in theme, works by artists Craola, Travis Louie, Nicola Verlato, Andrew Hem, Lezley Saar, Todd Carpenter, devNgosha, and more compliment eachother nicely. Take a look at our photos from opening night after the jump!

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Zhao Na’s elaborate acrylic and ink paintings explore nature’s splendor. Her recent work, Drunk in Autumn, features a variety of exotic creatures such as red pandas, koalas, and leopards napping peacefully in a plentiful pomegranate tree. Her paintings typically show expansive scenes with many animal characters engaged in a variety of activities at once. Detail shots of her work reveal tight brushstrokes more evocative of drawing than painting. Na’s detail-oriented paintings allow viewers to get lost in the many microcosms within them.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Idealized nude figures are a longstanding tradition in Western art history and, as viewers, we’re accustomed to seeing the female body exposed. But the bodies we see today — not only in art, but in magazines, films, and music videos — adhere to certain constraints in regards to their size, shape, skin tone, and even age. With her large-scale paintings, Brooklyn-based painter Aleah Chapin shows the beauty of realistic physiques not typically shown in our society’s visual culture.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Serra Victoria Bothwell Fels creates wooden installations inspired by the geometric arrangements of crystal formations. The artist stacks thin pieces of wood into tessellating triangular shapes, using them to create hive-like structures that viewers can enter. Fels’s installations are based on her elaborate blueprints, which she displays as artworks in their own right. The wood she uses is sourced from discarded construction materials. Functional and visually appealing, her works evoke makeshift shelters that viewers can temporarily inhabit.

by CaroPosted on

On Saturday night, Los Angeles pop-up space 80Forty transformed into Lola’s “The Younger”. Her exhibition, 2-years in the making, tells the personal story of Lola’s creative upbringing in an environment full of personal touches. The space included her own fireplace mantel, as seen in our studio visit, with decorative furniture and 3d pieces on display. As the title suggests, we follow the ‘younger’ Lola into adulthood through a series of playful symbolism. In her youth, Lola spent time drawing with her father, also an artist, and playing with the toys inherited from her grandparents. These experiences find their way into her paintings, featuring Alice in Wonderland-like little girls in whimsical situations.