by CaroPosted on

Wisconsin based artist Kelly Jelinek combines the art form of taxidermy with upholstery to create her colorful and unusual animal sculptures. The name of her art studio is derived from the artist’s last name, Jelinek, which means “little deer” or “little stag” in Czech, so it might seem no coincidence that she feels a strong connection to nature. But even more importantly, her work is faux and kill-free, and as a lifelong animal lover, she remains committed to making art that preserves the fantasy of animals while they were still alive.

by CaroPosted on

Though New York based artist Casey Baugh’s oil paintings are generally described as realistic, there is a wonderous quality about them as well that does not exist in real life. First featured on our blog here, Baugh once compared his unique sense of reality in his paintings to one his first passions, photography, an art form that portrays a parallel universe or a version of reality that is “slightly off.” As seen in his instructional videos at his website, he works like a photographer does in a dark room when it comes to painting, building from values and highly saturated colors until his subjects start to take form. The result is a vivid reality that takes realism to a higher, almost unsettling level with a narrative that taps into our complexities and insecurities.

by CaroPosted on

A new museum is being built off of Spain’s Lanzarote island- underwater. It is the vision of artist Jason deCaires Taylor, previously featured on our blog, whose ghostly underwater figures have been exhibited in similar areas all over the world, including Grenada, the West Indies, Nassau, Bahamas, and Cancun, Mexico. Over 300 statues are being placed on the sea floor in Lanzarote’s Las Coloradas Bay, a UNESCO’s biosphere reserve, at depths of 12-15 meters where divers and snorkelers of all skill levels can view them.

by CaroPosted on

Some refer to them as glass and stone enchantments, others as tomb-like and unsettling, but to artist Christina Bothwell, her work is highly spiritual. Her translucent figures rising from their bodies evoke images of a butterfly emerging from its chrysalis, feeling mutually protected and secure but also fragile in spite of their hardy material. We first featured Bothwell’s works on our blog, and since then, she has gone on to explore more personal themes, dealing with the fear of her own mortality, as well as the fragility and temporary qualities of our bodies, versus the idea that we are more than just physical beings.

by Sasha BogojevPosted on

Drawing inspiration from old stickers, Howard Stern, cartoons, sunsets, reggae album covers, Garbage Pail Kids, T-Shirt graphics, Mad Magazine or sandwiches, Sean Norvet has been creating and showing his art that “mashes up elegant photo-realism with two-dimensional cartoon buffoonery”. Through a mixture of photo references and imagination, his pieces are sometimes explosive, sometimes still, but always focused on humorous side of things. Using his references the same way a Hip hop producer uses audio samples, he takes these visuals and applies them where needed by warping, distorting and patching them together.

by CaroPosted on

Budapest, Hungary based photographer Flora Borsi specializes in digital photography and photo manipulations, where she seeks to visualize the physically impossible. We first featured her work on our Tumblr blog, a surreal series that imagined what the “real life models” of abstract artists Pablo Picasso, Amedeo Modigliani, Rudolf Hausner, and Kazimir Malevich might have looked liked. Her new series, titled “Animeyed (self portraits)” digitally overlaps images of the artist’s own face with animals into a single “animal eye”.