by Andy SmithPosted on

It took more than three years to complete, but just last month, artist Manabu Ikeda unveiled the 13 x 10 foot “Rebirth” at Chazen Museum of Art in Madison, Wis. Inspiration for the piece came from the effects of the Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami in Japan. The event, known as the Great East Japan Earthquake, was responsible for nearly 16,000 deaths, more than 6,000 injured and thousands missing. Hundreds of thousands were also displaced from their homes.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Nick Runge, a Los Angeles-based artist, crafts dreamlike and moody paintings of mysterious figures and scenes. Though these works carry flashes of realism, these works carry abstractions that either push backdrops into otherworldly territory or interfere with the subject itself.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Russian artist Uno Moralez crafts images that are a throwback to seemingly less sophisticated, earlier days of digital art. Yet, what the artist has done is forge a novel, fascinating way to communicate narrative. They’re not quite comics, yet Moralez often depends on more than one image to share his stories, which move between pulp, campy horror, sci-fi, or something stranger and dream-like.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Artist Stephan Brusche, also known as iSteef, is primarily known for his work with an uncommon medium: the banana. His pieces, blending drawing and sculpture, take many forms (but mostly, you know, banana-shaped).

by Andy SmithPosted on

Sculptor Sophie Prestigiacomo reflects our ongoing and tense dialogue with nature with her swamp creatures in the Marshes Nature Reserve of Séné in the Gulf of Morbihan in France. It began with two mysterious beings a few years ago, and after they departed, a recent crowdfunding campaign to bring eight total to the reserve. Or as the campaign stated (as translated from French): “more numerous, more curious and probably convinced by the first visit of their two ambassadors, there was a relationship tie with the human species.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Spanish artist Aryz has created massive public art across the world over the past few years. His style, a blend of pop art and vibrant surrealism, looms over city streets and waterways in recent stops in China, the Netherlands, and Belgium. The piece “Axis,” above, part of the Back to School Project, was created three months ago in Chongqing in southwestern China.