by Andy SmithPosted on

Los Angeles-born artist Camille Rose Garcia crafts vibrant, horror-infused paintings. A new show at Dorothy Circus Gallery in Italy, titled “The Ballrooms of Mars,” compile a new body of work from the artist. Her multimedia pieces are often cited as being influenced by Max Fleischer, Disney, ’50s-era films, and the work of William Burroughs. The show kicks off Feb. 24 and runs through April 7.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Angela Gram’s oil paintings are alive with explorations of the natural world injected with distorted, vibrant sensibility. “The Past is Alive,” a show running at Gallery Poulsen in Denmark from Feb. 24 through the end of March, collects a new set of kinetic works. This new collection “The Past is Alive,” a show running at Gallery Poulsen in Denmark through “constant fascination with the monstrously surreal, expressed through her deconstructed animal kingdom.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Scott M. Greene’s surreal oil paintings explore several aspects of the Western experience: politics, pop culture, our relationship to the natural world, and the history of art itself. The artist says that the meaning of each work remains elusive for even him until some time has passed with the work, often not working with a complete idea and instead building one idea onto another.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Scare away unpleasant odors (and people) with the Hi-Fructose subscriber-exclusive air-freshening Ghoul by Craig Gleason. We’re please to announce that all existing subscribers and the next 500 subscribers will receive this peach-smelling bad guy with Hi-Fructose Vol. 47. The freshener is made by the fine horrible people at Rubbish Rubbish.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Chris Buzelli

The inaugural exhibition at Star Gallery in New York City, “American Monsters,” explores the insidious icons of U.S. pop culture. With a list of artists that includes Armando Veve, Thomas Fluharty, Anthony Freda, Devin Clark, Ellen Weinstein, David Miller, David Flaherty, David Goldin, Epyon5, Zhang Yiqing, Nich Chiechi, Marissa Mahabir and several others.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Nora Fok’s blend of textile and jewelry art results in otherworldly pieces, implementing a variety of materials and processes for statements that resemble little else in wearable fashion. Despite their progressive, sometimes futuristic look, the pieces often implement age-old approaches: braiding, weaving, and knitting are used to string together hundreds of elements like nylon monofilament and beads.