by Andy SmithPosted on


Young Chun

It’s the 46th volume of Hi-Fructose!

Featured in this issue are …
Craig Gleason‘s drawings of Bad Guys, the badass quilts of Ben Venom, the super saccharine starlet paintings of cover artist Young Chun, the art and murals of Koralie, Ryan Heshka‘s Mean Girls Club, the distorted and demented baby sculptures of Johnson Tsang, the surreal paintings of Horacio Quiroz, and the outstanding drawings of Sverre Malling. Plus multi-page reviews of the new monograph by Todd Schorr and Ernst Haekel.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Riccardo Mayr carefully adds elements and characters from the Star Wars franchise to original oil paintings from the 17th and 18th centuries. A new show, “Religious Paintings of the Expanded Galaxy,” collects these works at Gallery 30 South in Pasadena. The gallery says one goal is to “present religious faith and ethics in a post-modern paradigm largely embedded in fictional reality through a multi-generational exposure and fascination with successful science fiction movies.”

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Yinka Shonibare MBE blends fiberglass figures, Dutch wax-printed cotton fabric, metal, handpainted globes, and more to craft sculptures that explore race, economics, and other social issues. The artist’s mixing of textures, materials, and cultural iconography offers complexity past an initial scan. He was last featured on HiFructose.com.

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Japanese artist Koichi Enomoto packs his oil paintings with manga influences, dystopian visions, and pop culture nods. Often, these pieces offer a dialogue about mankind’s relationship with technology, in particular. The artist calls his work “my private myth, like a vision, rising from the relations between my own and public reality.”

by Andy SmithPosted on


Photo: Kate Russell

Since last year, buzz has swirled around an art complex in Santa Fe, N.M., a former bowling alley converted into a blending of a “jungle gym, haunted house, children’s museum, and immersive art exhibit.” Meow Wolf is the production company behind the effort, and its crown jewel is the 20,000 square foot interactive art experience “House of Eternal Return.” In this post, we take a look inside the massive exhibit.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Manga artist Shintaro Kago subverts the form in his provocative, occasionally grotesque narratives. In one tale, in particular, the typical panels become three-dimension vessels, from which his characters break out and manipulate. “Abstraction” shows off both Kago’s knack for the unsettling and the satirical.